What is this roo's color name?

Shaunassy

Chirping
Apr 2, 2016
177
17
83
Fl
4 of my six americauna chicks turned out to be roos, one black,one lavender, and two are really pretty but I dont know what theie feathering color is officially called. If anyone could help me it would be greatly appreciated :)

Roo1
400

400


Roo 2
400


400
 

Shaunassy

Chirping
Apr 2, 2016
177
17
83
Fl
Thank you! I noticed one has more black while the other has more blue. Is there one thats colors are better for breeding purposes or does that not matter? I want to keep one of the 4 roosters but have never raised a roo before. Is there an age you can safely say you know the disposition of the roo will be? Ive only ever bought already mature roosters before.
 

junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
23,102
8,203
491
Long Beach, WA
One is just a darker "blue" than the other. If you are wanting to breed for 'pure' Ameraucana, then you should only pair them with hens/pullets of the same variety, otherwise you will be producing Easter Eggers.
 

Shaunassy

Chirping
Apr 2, 2016
177
17
83
Fl
I do have other ameracauna hens that are pure, I have black and wheaton hens. I just got new chicks from a breeder to freshen up the lines and get a roo which i didnt have.
 

junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
23,102
8,203
491
Long Beach, WA
I do have other ameracauna hens that are pure, I have black and wheaton hens. I just got new chicks from a breeder to freshen up the lines and get a roo which i didnt have.
The thing is, it doesn't matter if all your hens are pure Ameraucana. If they are a different variety, you will not get Ameraucana. You will be breeding Easter Eggers. The Blue Wheaten boys to the Black hens will produce Easter Eggers. It's not about pedigree with chicken breeds. It's all about does this bird match a standard for both body type and coloring, and does it reproduce in a predictable manner. You have to keep in mind that each variety was created using different breeds to get the coloring. They are, essentially, different breeds. Foundation stock for the Blacks was completely different from the gene pool that produced the Wheaten varieties.
Make sense?
It does not matter if both parents are 'pure' Ameraucana. If they are different varieties, they will not produce offspring that match the requirements for Ameraucana. Same goes for any other breed.
 

Shaunassy

Chirping
Apr 2, 2016
177
17
83
Fl
Ahhh ok I see, Ill have to seperate my wheaton americauna girls with a wheaton roo then and seperate my black americauna hens with the black roo.thank you:)
 

newchickNt0wn

Hatching
Nov 14, 2015
2
0
6
The thing is, it doesn't matter if all your hens are pure Ameraucana. If they are a different variety, you will not get Ameraucana. You will be breeding Easter Eggers. The Blue Wheaten boys to the Black hens will produce Easter Eggers. It's not about pedigree with chicken breeds. It's all about does this bird match a standard for both body type and coloring, and does it reproduce in a predictable manner. You have to keep in mind that each variety was created using different breeds to get the coloring. They are, essentially, different breeds. Foundation stock for the Blacks was completely different from the gene pool that produced the Wheaten varieties.
Make sense? 
It does not matter if both parents are 'pure' Ameraucana. If they are different varieties, they will not produce offspring that match the requirements for  Ameraucana. Same goes for any other breed.


It actually does not apply to all other breeds. A black silkie over a splash silkie yields blue silkies. Other colors that are non standard are also still recognized as silkies, they are just considered non standard. An Ameraucana to an Ameraucana should still be considered an Ameraucana no matter the color. It's just a non standard bird, but not a whole different breed altogether. I know you serious breeders out there like to argue that, but it's really just very snobby sounding. Color variations shoul not change the breed.
 
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junebuggena

Crowing
Apr 17, 2015
23,102
8,203
491
Long Beach, WA
It actually does not apply to all other breeds. A black silkie over a splash silkie yields blue silkies. Other colors that are non standard are also still recognized as silkies, they are just considered non standard. An Ameraucana to an Ameraucana should still be considered an Ameraucana no matter the color. It's just a non standard bird, but not a whole different breed altogether. I know you serious breeders out there like to argue that, but it's really just very snobby sounding. Color variations shoul not change the breed.
Blue/Black/Splash varieties are actually an exception to the rule, since they are all based on the same pattern genes. The only difference is the presence or lack of the dilute gene. When it come to chickens breed is not dependant on lineage. It's purely based on whether or not a breed meets the breed standard, and if it will breed true at least 50% of the time when paired with another bird of the same coloring. Sorry, that's just how it is. I didn't make the rules.
The bird in question doesn't have solid pattern genes. There is clearly silver ground coloring showing, indicating that it did not come from 'pure' Blue stock. It is also expressing red leakage through the wings, further evidence of mixed color genetics. This means that the bird will not breed true, and making him ineligible for the Ameraucana label.
 

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