What Kind of Knife Do You Use To Make The Kill Cut?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by machoman, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. machoman

    machoman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've used several knives and am curious on input.

    Old Hickory works for my friend, but my new knife sharpener doesn't seem to sharpen enough.

    Razor Blade seems ok, but dulls quickly.

    I do live the pampered chef paring knives, but shipping is expensive.

    Has anyone tried scalpels? I'm thinking about trying that.

    I've ( and so did the roos )a had a couple of bad experiences on larger roosters and am looking for something very sharp.
     
  2. TedJan92_in_Idaho

    TedJan92_in_Idaho Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use a good swede made hatchet. Can do 100 then touch up the blade
     
  3. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    my husband shoots the bigger birds in the head.. for smaller birds I just lop off the head with a pair of pruners
     
  4. AZBootsie

    AZBootsie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Glad you posted this question, I also am in need of advice.

    I tried a disposable scalpel a couple of weeks ago. (My first roo processing experience). It felt akward, like the blade wasn't long enogh to curve around his neck. Picked up a knife at Cabello's to try next time. It is a 4" utility knife I found with the kitchen knives made by Victorinox Swiss Army inc.
    [​IMG]
    Any opinions?? I am going to do another roo on sat or sun. Guess I will find out then if it does the job or not.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  5. ozark_chickies

    ozark_chickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We use a hatchet for the head. I finish up with a old hickery knife. Easy to sharpen, and keeps a keen edge. Knife must be 30 years old.
     
  6. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    4" Filet knife. If you've had problems with full grown roos, don't feel bad about having troubles. They have so many feathers where you need to cut, it makes it difficult no matter what type knife you use, and feathers dull knives very quickly.
     
  7. mystang89

    mystang89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've never killed any of the birds yet but can't you break their necks then use an ax or just go straight to the ax first?
     
  8. AZBootsie

    AZBootsie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yep, several ways it can be done. Guess each person does what is best for them. I researched a bit and decided on cutting the jugular. The Bird has to bleed out anyway? It seemed like a method less likely for me to mess up.
     
  9. ozark_chickies

    ozark_chickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:You can do it either way. We chop off the heads, because it is over quickly, and they bleed out well.
     
  10. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    The trick is to find the Right Spot on the neck, then any kind of sharp blade will do. I put the birds in cones, draw out their heads, gently pull and bend to one side so the skin is taut. There's a bare spot just behind the point of the jaw, on the side of the neck.

    I've used utility knife blades (both the trapezoidal and the long rectangular ones). The ones designed for cutting through wallpaper seem the sharpest. It helps to stick some duct tape to them, or tie a bit of cord to them, so they don't get lost in the grass.

    I also like a fish fileting knife I bought at WalMart in the fishing equipment aisle. It's long, thin, & sharp.

    But really, any sharp knife will do, even a paring knife. It needn't be long or thick. It's best to find that bare spot, otherwise you're sawing through feathers and making the job take longer and dull your knife sooner. And having the neck stretched & bent makes the skin taut and easier to slice. I set the blade in place and make a firm decisive cut in & forward, away from me & my hand. I'm right-handed so I start on the right side for my first cut. If you get a good flow of blood you know you've done it right and sent your bird Across The Road in an instant. Then I make a similar cut on the other side. I usually hold the head steady until it stops flopping around, to direct the blood into the can and keep it from spattering around everywhere.
     

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