What tools would you suggest

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by rolffamily, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. rolffamily

    rolffamily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wisconsin
    My hubby, who is much more comfortable under a car hood, built my coop this summer with a big table saw. Since he has little interest in woodworking that is about the only wood tool he has except for a mitre box. Now I'd like to be able to hang shelves, put a lip on the poop board, etc without running to him every time I need something done. What handy tools would you recommend I get?
     
  2. True Grit

    True Grit Chillin' With My Peeps

    I got DH a big electric mitre saw for his birthday. He leaves it set up on the work bench and I can cut something I want at any time. You just pull the saw blade down on top of the board. It was about $200 though so might be overkill for what you want to do. Can he leave the tablesaw set up and teach you how to use it? One tool I do use all the time is his Bosch cordless rechargeable drill-so handy not to have to drag cords around.
     
  3. SparksNV

    SparksNV Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The one tool I use the most is a power drill - we have 2, one is battery (with a second battery pack) and an electric one. I use one to drill pilot holes then the second one to drill in the screws. That way, you don't have to change the bit.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2010
  4. lleighmay

    lleighmay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't want to invest in a miter saw a good circular saw is an excellent substitute for the types of cutting it sounds like you want to do.
     
  5. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    The most powerful rechargeable, cordless drill you can get. I use mine all the time. At least an 18 volt, but check the balance in your hand, too. Some are very nose heavy and your wrist will ache after a few hours.

    I happened upon a Bosch package deal at Home Depot, on sale. It had the 18 volt drill, a 5" circular trim saw and 2 batteries with charger for $ 59.99. It has been the handiest thing ever for me, from household improvements to coop building. The saw will zip right through 2" x 4"s and plywood.

    Love it all, and it has been surprisingly long-lasting and reliable.

    edited for clarity.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2010
  6. Crabella

    Crabella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Inland Pacific NW
    Hand tools: Hammer, screw drivers, (get ones with the larger handles) pliers, crescent wrench, dykes (wire cutter)
    Power tools: Compound miter saw, Cordless drill/driver (I recommend lithium ion 14 or 18 v because the battery is smaller/lighter), jig saw, sander
    Misc. an assortment of drill bits, another of driver bits.

    When shopping for your drill/driver etc... Pick them up. Most tools are designed for men's larger hands. There are smaller, lighter weight ones out there (I just went shopping) Might not seem like a big deal, but if you are out ther for 3 or 4+ hours working away, your arms/wrists and shoulders will thank you. Many times big box stores (Sears, HD, Lowes) will have sales on them around Thanksgiving, and you can get small sets of hand tools fairly reasonable.

    Have fun. Starting with the small projects is a good way to learn. I always talk to some of the guys at the local hardware/ lumber yards when I start a new project. I go in and just say "hey guys, this is what I want to do, What do you recommend". Sometimes I take a sketch w/some measurements. They have been great about modifying my sketches, giving directions easier ways to do things. In the last two years, I built our pump house, two decks and am almost done with my coop. Yes, I had to enlist the men in my life for some of the "grunt work"... but 90% of it is mine... and most of the screw ups were from the cheap labor! [​IMG]
     
  7. chicks4kids

    chicks4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Northern Indiana
    My collection of tools in my chicken coop consist of:

    a cordless drill
    box of 2.5 inch screws
    box of 1.25 inch screws
    a circular saw
    a hand saw
    a sawzall (spelling?)
    2 pr. pliers
    a staple gun
    box of staples
    bag of zip ties
    a pr. of wire cutters
    heavy duty scissors
    tape measure

    It seems like I'll go out there to see the birds and get an idea of something that I want to "fix" or "do" real quick. Having these out there really does make it go real quick--not having to walk back to the garage to raid hubby's tools [​IMG] Yep, super fast fixin' [​IMG]
     
  8. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Variable speed reversing drill with screwdriver bits and drill bits, and a 7" circular saw, and some minimal hand tools - one hammer, two screwdrivers (flat and phillips.) Go somewhere like HD and buy what is comfortable in your hand. Don't buy either the cheapest or the most expensive. Talk to the sales clerks. Old woman talking here; this is all I ever use any more, and I could use dozens of my son's tools.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 31, 2010
  9. mgw

    mgw Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Eastern Wa.
    The most useful tool you can buys a cordless drill. I got two craftsman 18Vs for 29.99 each at an early bird sale the day after Thanks giving at sears. So keep your eyes open during the Xmas season. The next most useful tools that you can get are a circular saw, mitre saw, and regular electric drill in that order IME.
     
  10. rolffamily

    rolffamily Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Thanks for your suggestions. For sure a drill will have to be top of the list. Does anyone work with a jig saw? I figure that might be useful for the small jobs, but I am guessing.
     

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