What Would You Consider "Organic"?

PepsNick

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May 9, 2010
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This thread has seemed to turn into one where we discuss the regulations on what raising organic chickens and eggs really mean. Discuss.
 
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PepsNick

Back to Business
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May 9, 2010
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Egglanta, GA
Thanks. As I said in the post, I was pretty sure, but not positive. I did have the right to claim organic, because it was organic.

Will switch the labels, and not deliver again until that is done.
 

Cindiloohoo

Quiet as a Church Mouse
11 Years
Dec 19, 2009
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If I'm not mistaken Nick you'll never be able to claim organic on these hens eggs again either..because they have at some point consumed inorganic feed. Weird how that stuff works
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Cindiloohoo

Quiet as a Church Mouse
11 Years
Dec 19, 2009
7,471
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Quote:
Those organic folks are pretty picky! A chick who has ever had any antibiotics can not be considered organic either from what I am to understand, which to me seems ridiculously overboard...but whateva.
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Mac in Wisco

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May 25, 2007
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Quote:
There is more to it than just feeding organic feed. To use the term "Organic" you have to follow all of the rules of the National Organic Program. Chicks have to be raised from the second day of life on organic feed. If they are ever fed anything else, including non-organic table scraps, non-organic scratch, non-organic hay, etc., then they are ineligible for organic production.

Hens must have access to the outdoors, weather permitting. Any pasture that they use must have been managed organically for the previous three years, which means no synthetic fertilizers, synthetic pesticides, or manure from non-organically managed animals. That means if you like to use Scott's on the lawn, then your hens shouldn't have access to the lawn. Technically, if you have raised non-organic animals on the same pasture then that pasture should be ineligible for organic production for three years.
 

Medicine Man

Songster
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Nov 21, 2010
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Quote:
There is more to it than just feeding organic feed. To use the term "Organic" you have to follow all of the rules of the National Organic Program. Chicks have to be raised from the second day of life on organic feed. If they are ever fed anything else, including non-organic table scraps, non-organic scratch, non-organic hay, etc., then they are ineligible for organic production.

Hens must have access to the outdoors, weather permitting. Any pasture that they use must have been managed organically for the previous three years, which means no synthetic fertilizers, synthetic pesticides, or manure from non-organically managed animals. That means if you like to use Scott's on the lawn, then your hens shouldn't have access to the lawn. Technically, if you have raised non-organic animals on the same pasture then that pasture should be ineligible for organic production for three years.

Exactly. You have to go through the whole certification process...not just throw organic food at them.
 

Mac in Wisco

Antagonist
12 Years
May 25, 2007
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Quote:
You don't necessarily have to go through the certification process. If you gross less than $5000 a year in organic sales, you are allowed to sell your products as "Organic" as long as you follow the National Organic Plan. Certifying would be an option and with certification you would be able to label your products "USDA Certified Organic".
 

MANNA-PRO

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