What's in your chicken medicine cabinet?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jolly wattles, Oct 6, 2018.

  1. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    I would keep them all in the house...cool, dark place.
     
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  2. Kimmyh51

    Kimmyh51 Songster

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    My duck medicine cabinet has whatever I can scrounge from unused prescriptions of family and friends, as antibiotics and most useful drugs cannot be brought without a prescription here.
    The fact that not one single antibiotic can be purchased here is most frustrating... As is my jealousy that apparently in the US you guys can just go to a department store (walmart) and buy a bottle of decent antibiotics for a few dollars? I would LOVE TO BE ABLE TO DO THAT!

    Here if I do find a vet to prescribe antibiotics it costs me $40-60 for the vet consult, $10-20 for the prescription, $10 dispensing fee, and then $70 to well over $100 for enough medication for one duck.

    I paid $70 for a few ml of enrofloxin at one vet which did two 2 week old ducklings only 2 days, then I had to switch them to oxytetracycline to finish treating their respiatory infection because the enrofloxin ran out(at dose the vet prescribed for the ducklings).

    Oxytetracycline is the only antibiotic that seems to be available (on prescription only, like all of them) at q reasonable cost. I can get it for $88 (plus additional vet consult, plus dispensing and prescribing fees) for a 500g container. Any other antibiotic in that quantity would be literally $500-$100 or more.

    I normally have
    some antibiotics (doxycycline, penicillin/augmenton)
    Pain relief (nsaids celebrex which can be given to ducks, and is easier to get than metacam which id prefer to give) prednisone, asprin.
    Syringes
    Self adhesive bandages
    Colloidal silver
    Hyaluronic acid powder
    Calcium
    Metachlopramide
    Herbs in the vegie garden
    Lubricants, water or silicone based (for hatching assistance)
    Topical Antibacterial or antibiotic creams/ointments
    Antibiotic eye drops or ointment
    Steriod topical
    Super glue (crazy glue) for 'stitching' wounds
    Sterile water, saline, or colloidal silver for wound rinsing.
    Scalpel or new stanley knife
    Tweezers
    Nurses scissors or similar
    Sterile bandage, pad, or dressing.
    Peroxide
    Potassium permanganate
    Ice cream sticks (for making splints etc)
    Clean dry hand towels, rags, pillow cases etc for covering heat pads, use as bedding, and for using in minor procedures to cover the table, and covering the ducks head(ie removing bumblefoot)
    Abamectin




    In a perfect world I would also have

    Oxytetracycline, erythromycin
    Metacam
    Diazepam, midazolam, Buprenorphine
    A range of dressings, including dressings that adhere directly to wounds, these are expensve but sometimes my nurse friend has some she can give me
    Iodine dressings and ointments
    Anti fungal oral (flucanazole) oral/topical (nystatin)
    Needles and sterile syringes
    Sterile scalpel
    Sterile forceps/tweezers
    Ivermectin


    In a perfect ideal world Id also have

    Baytril
    Enrofloxin
    A nebuliser
    An autoclave, or a pressure cooker with a working diy steam evacuation system (to steralise things then suck all the steam out, inother words a poor mans home made autoclave)
    Oxygen and equipment to administer it.
    Local anesthetic
    Oh, and a veterinary science degree lol.
     
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  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Not really, and not anymore for oral AB's for animals...rightly so, IMO,
    because of blatant mis-use and over-use and the problems that causes.

    Where in this world are you located?
    Climate is almost always a factor.
    Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
    It's easy to do, then it's always there!
    upload_2018-10-11_8-0-42.png
     
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  4. MickWithChicks

    MickWithChicks Songster

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    Liquid Calcium -- Avi-Calcium
    Liquid Multi/Amino -- Avi-Vital
    Liquid de-Wormer -- Kilverm
    Ivermectin Oral Drench
    Ivermectin Pour On
    Permethrin
    Mineral Supplement -- Dine-a-chook
    Epsom Salts
    Preparation H - non-medicated
    KY
    Peroxide

    Standard first aid kit with bandages, scalpel, scissors, plasters, liquid plaster.
    Needleless syringes
    Latex gloves

    Pipe cutters for the inevitable (which I've been fortunate enough to not need to use yet).
     
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  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    What kind of pipe cutter?
     
  6. MickWithChicks

    MickWithChicks Songster

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    East Coast of Australia
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Ahh, thank you, that's what I thought.... does the blade close all the way quickly, or ratchet down with multiple 'squeezes'? Bet it's sharp as hell.
    Not that I wish you to have had to use it, but sure wonder how effective it is.
     
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  8. MickWithChicks

    MickWithChicks Songster

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    It does ratchet and would require two or three squeezes depending on the size of the chick/hen/rooster you were culling. It makes a very clean cut on PVC, and used right (blade facing the spine) would reduce the amount of suffering from a standard slit throat or the inaccuracies of a hatchet.

    It is possible to get non-ratcheting versions too: https://www.bunnings.com.au/holman-universal-poly-pipe-cutter_p3120192

    Given the choice, I'd probably choose the broomstick method in most circumstances, but a pipe cutter for processing birds or culling chicks seems the most humane to me and the hardest to stuff up.
     
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  9. jolly wattles

    jolly wattles Songster

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    Curious how most of yall accurately weigh your birds? For dosage purposes.
     
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  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General

    I use a kitchen scale for anything under 5 kg, a bathroom scale for birds over 5 kg, and sometimes I use a luggage scale. When I use the luggage scale I place the bird in a feed sack and weigh bird in sack.
    luggage scale_1.jpg
     

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