Whats the difference between Mottled and Self Mottled??????

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by SilkieCRZYness, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. SilkieCRZYness

    SilkieCRZYness Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 9, 2008
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    Can someone explain the genetics on a mottled and self mottled??? I have some birds come out with just a few white feathers or spots, then others are covered in white spots.... Does that mean one is a self mottled and one is a mottled? Also....whats the genetics to it...when breeding, how do you get what??? Thank You
     
  2. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Please explain self mottled.. That is anew term to me. Mottled as a gene exists and is recessive. it can on occasion make an appearance if crossed and teh other color or pattern is also recessive but seldom in that form is very good mottling. the Mottling itself should be uniform and evenly tipped on each feather seperated by a small black bar from the primary ground color of teh bird.
     
  3. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    I've honestly never heard of Self-mottled.

    Mottled itself though is E/E (extended black, makes the bird pure black) Ml/Ml (mottling) - The degree of how mottled a bird is really is just quality as far as I'm concerned.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Young birds tend to have less mottling than older ones, Typically, the older the bird, the whiter it will be. Mottling can show in juvenile feathers only one copy of hte gene is present, but it will molt out and not be present in adult feathering.

    I've never heard "self" used with mottling. It would seem to be a contradiction as "self" means a solid cooloured bird.
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:mo/mo, not Ml/Ml (melanotic). Someone hasn't had her coffee yet [​IMG]
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Extended Black only? I thought the Speckled Sussex was E^Wh/E^Wh, not E/E.
     
  7. SilkieCRZYness

    SilkieCRZYness Chillin' With My Peeps

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    WOOOPSEEEEE..... Not self......split*** That was my early morning typo... I apologize... maybe now you all can clarify what split is... I do have some chicks... 3 months old, some have a ton of white mottling and others only a few specs....is that the difference from split to mottled? I apologize again!
     
  8. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Quote:mo/mo, not Ml/Ml (melanotic). Someone hasn't had her coffee yet [​IMG]

    lol No!
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Split means they have one copy of MO and one copy of mo, Mo/mo. If they are split, they will not show the mottling in the adult plumage since it is recessive.
     
  10. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Quote:Speckled Sussex aren't the same "mottled" as other birds, in fact they're considered Spangled. Still with the mottling gene, but, they're E^Wh as well as carrying Mahogany and Columbian.
     

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