When should I put my chicks outside?

DoveStar

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 13, 2013
48
3
67
Chandler, AZ
Now, I am often reading answers such as 6-8 weeks or fully feathered, but those people live in the colder states. I live in scorching Chandler, Arizona.
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It is a beautiful fall here, with the highs during the day in the high 80's and the lows at night around 60 (F). I have 4, almost three week old chicks living in a brooder in my house, but they are outgrowing it! I've already had to upgrade them twice, and don't have anything big/tall enough to move them to now!
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They are flying around everywhere; I even put a screen on top only for them to chirp unhappily when they bonk their heads. Since I live in a hotter state, where the weather for the next few weeks will stay about the same, I was wondering if it was too early to move them outside? Their coop is in a sunny area with bedding and is draft free. If I do move them now, should I provide a heat bulb too? Thanks for any help!
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Den in Penn

Songster
8 Years
Dec 15, 2011
3,418
216
216
SE Pa.
At three weeks the recommended brooder temperature is 85. They should be alright during the day while they are active. I would bring them in or move the heat source out for them at night. With them wanting to get out of the brooder inside I would definitely move them out if I could.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,696
32,253
1,092
On the MN prairie.
If you have a coop you can put them in, go ahead and get them out of the house! If it's in the 80's during the day, they'll be plenty warm. My chicks are always started out in the coop, and I live in MN. I got my day-olds on May 1 this year and straight to the coop they went. They had heat lamps (2 of them) and plenty of straw and were fine, and our nights were down into the 40's. You can have some heat in there for them at night. The way to know how they're doing is to watch them. If they're huddling under the light, they're cold - lower it. If they're all moving away from the light, they're plenty warm so you could raise it a bit. Make sure they have enough room to get away from the heat source if they need to.




(In these pictures they're all crowded away because I was in there and they didn't like it)
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
8,886
11,101
636
western South Dakota
Get them outside, they will have more space and be happier and healthier. If you coop is properly wired for electricity, then a heat lamp at night for a bit. If not, then lay down a cardboard box, they will go into the box at night, bring the box into the house at night just for 3-4 night, until they acclimate.

A lot of coop fires are started by heat lamps, straw, and extension cords! Don't risk it.

Mrs K
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,696
32,253
1,092
On the MN prairie.
Get them outside, they will have more space and be happier and healthier. If you coop is properly wired for electricity, then a heat lamp at night for a bit. If not, then lay down a cardboard box, they will go into the box at night, bring the box into the house at night just for 3-4 night, until they acclimate.

A lot of coop fires are started by heat lamps, straw, and extension cords! Don't risk it.

Mrs K
A very good warning. (No extension cords in my coop - it's wired, but we did have the heat lamps and straw)
 

DoveStar

Chirping
6 Years
Apr 13, 2013
48
3
67
Chandler, AZ
thanks so much guys! I ended up moving them outside for a few days and bringing them in at night before transitioning them to full-time outside. :) they are out there all the time now, and love it! :)
 

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