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When to Cull a BCM Rooster and Should I breed first?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jlgoinggreen, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. jlgoinggreen

    jlgoinggreen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a gorgeous Black Copper Marans rooster. He is absolutely perfect! Has all the qualities every one seems to seek and desire in a show quality BCM. The only problem is he is really mean. He loves my husband and doesn't attack him, but he will attack the rest of us. Yesterday they got water, but did not get fed till late because the food container was on the other side of the coop and once the water was put in he would not go back upstairs. We had to wait for my husband to get home to feed them. Now he is wonderful with his hens and we even have another rooster in there with them and he is so sweet with him too. It's just humans (with the exception of my husband) that he hates.

    Now I am new to breeding in the sense that I have never had to cull anyone. I have always been fortunate enough to end up with great birds (great in looks, egg colors, temperaments, etc...) and have only really culled to get new lines in. This is the first time I am culling for temperament. He is only a little over 4 months old and his sisters have already started laying gorgeous eggs. So should I breed him first or is it a bad idea to breed a mean rooster (even if he is perfect in every other way)? I am really confused right now and only you guys will understand how sad I am. I really love him. Love to just sit and watch him. Just wish he wasn't so darn mean. [​IMG]




    ***Editing to state he "seems" perfect in every way to me. I have never shown my birds. I have only sold eggs for consumption. I do like having beautiful birds and am very careful to breed and buy birds that I read are the qualities people are seeking, but in no way shape or form does that make me an expert in breeding. Just wanted to clear that up so there is no misunderstandings. I am still fairly new to breeding, but having so much fun with it. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2011
  2. ChickenAlgebra

    ChickenAlgebra Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    NEVER breed a mean roo, he will only produce mean sons.
     
  3. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    I guess this could go two ways.

    1. You don't breed him first because he might have mean sons. Now you're out a rooster

    2. You go ahead and breed him, hatch out the eggs. Then you have a couple options.
    *Keep just the pullets and eat the roos when they're big enough.
    *Keep the pullets and the roos and if they show signs of being aggressive, you eat em. If they don't turn aggressive, Hooray for you!

    Chickens aren't like dogs. You wouldn't breed an aggressive dog because if the puppies are aggressive, you just bred aggressive dogs and now they're loose on the world. lol. With chickens, if they turn out aggressive you eat them and you still got something out of them: dinner.
     
  4. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    If he's mean his sons more than likely will be too. I never keep or breed an aggressive roo.
     
  5. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    Roosters that are handled a lot as chicks and made pets of often turn out to be mean when they reach breeding age. I would breed him and do NOT make chick pets out of the next generation. Just raise them like the rest, feed, water, clean and nothing else. THEN you will know their true personalities, and not man made monsters like it sound like you have now. Another option is to cage the rooster separately for most of the week, then let him out to breed the girls one or two days a week. Make it your husband's responsibility to feed and care for the rooster, so you can go about taking care of the hens in a normal way.
     
  6. jlgoinggreen

    jlgoinggreen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much for the advice everyone. I really do appreciate the help.
     
  7. Keara

    Keara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Breeding pen:). I would just keep him confind, with the girls of your choice, that way he can't attack.

    Once you get enough chicks, then put him on the grill.
     
  8. blackbirds13

    blackbirds13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know pretty much nothing about chickens but did purchase some BCM's myself this year. I agree with onthespot. I think you should give him a shot and do like she says as best you can. If he is as nice as you say I can't see what you have to lose, except perhaps some potentially nice looking genes. If you don't want him I'm sure someone else will...you can ship him this way. Take care.
     
  9. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    I have a different opinion on this subject than many on this site.
    I breed show birds so appearance per the Standard is my primary goal. I never consider behavior as a culling decision point. If your male is as nice as you say & if you are planning to breed Black Copper Marans then I would keep him.
    Having bred chickens for about 50 years I have, needless to say, had many aggressive males. They do tend to produce aggressive male offspring.
     
  10. jlgoinggreen

    jlgoinggreen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks. I've been getting a lot of messages with your same opinion. Still considering the rebreeding part, but my dh is buddies with him and doesn't want to get rid of him. We will just be keeping him far away from our little ones for now.
     

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