When will they lay again?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by coolcanoechic, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. coolcanoechic

    coolcanoechic Chillin' With My Peeps

    I know everybody asks this question, and I just read about it in another post, but my situation is a little different.
    I just finished building a coop and purchased 3 hens from a breeder who free ranges. He does not use artificial lights in his coops. He told me to turn on their light at 3 am and then let them go to bed with the setting sun. Sounds good to me.
    I know it was traumatic for them to be taken away and put into a totally new environment. I have had them for just over a week now and have been treating them with goodies every day and keeping a regular routine of feeding, water, lights, ect.
    How long should it take before the extra light has an affect? Do they need extra time to acclimate? Just curious. I will keep them even if they don't lay until spring. They are just such sweeties! [​IMG]
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    It depends. Were they laying before you got them?? Taking the short days and colder temps out of the equation, it can take up to a month for some chickens to acclimate themselves to a new home. Others lay almost from the get-go. Even the diet they were on before (and now of course) can make a big difference. If they were being fed a lot of scratch, corn, etc. before (not nutritionally complete), then it may take their bodies a while to build up proper nutrients. And of course if they're molting it won't matter if they have light 24/7...they're not going to lay. So many factors to consider, aren't there???
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2011
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    How old are they?
     
  4. coolcanoechic

    coolcanoechic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Fred's Hens :

    How old are they?

    According to the breeder, they are 18 months old and had stopped laying due to the shorter daylight hours.​
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    18 months sounds reasonable. Many folks sell off their hens at this point. If they've been resting for awhile, the light therapy should be effective and they should resume lay. It takes awhile and you'll just have to give them time.
     
  6. coolcanoechic

    coolcanoechic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Fred's Hens :

    18 months sounds reasonable. Many folks sell off their hens at this point. If they've been resting for awhile, the light therapy should be effective and they should resume lay. It takes awhile and you'll just have to give them time.

    He said that they should lay for a while and that they should be processed by the fall. Gulp...[​IMG] I will have to cross that bridge when I get there. On a more promising note, he offered to sell me some of his prized breeds to raise in the spring. I forget what kind they are, but they are the ones that lay the really dark brown colored eggs.​
     
  7. coolcanoechic

    coolcanoechic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Fred's Hens :

    18 months sounds reasonable. Many folks sell off their hens at this point. If they've been resting for awhile, the light therapy should be effective and they should resume lay. It takes awhile and you'll just have to give them time.

    By the way, I enjoyed reading your page very much. Thanks for being soooooo helpful.
    Nancy​
     
  8. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:He said that they should lay for a while and that they should be processed by the fall. Gulp...[​IMG] I will have to cross that bridge when I get there. On a more promising note, he offered to sell me some of his prized breeds to raise in the spring. I forget what kind they are, but they are the ones that lay the really dark brown colored eggs.

    You don't HAVE to process them in the fall. They don't automatically stop laying at a certain age. They will slow down, but it just depends on your purpose for having them. If it is just for eggs, that's one thing, if they are also pets, that's another.

    I made the decision not to add light because I understand that, over all, the may live and lay longer if they have a rest. I do miss eggs this winter...but that's the choice I made. It's up to you. People totally do it both ways.

    Some folks on here have some pretty old chickens, some of which even lay an egg once in a while.
     
  9. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Everyone has to find their own system of managing their flocks, taking into account their enjoyment, their egg business should they have one, and the cost/benefit ratio of the flock. Feed costs are skyrocketing and shows no signs of retreating anytime soon. Your breeder follows his plan.

    We cull three times. The first is after 3 months of laying. Those that lay well stick around while those who few who might lay poorly are culled. We cull again before first moult. Only the very best hens are retained for a second laying season. It is also at this point that breeders are also selected. After a second season of laying, all the remainder are culled. We always have young pullets coming along. 2/3 of our winter flock is always first year layers, assuring production for our customers.

    We have folks anxious for our culled hens, at whatever stage. The are sold for small flocks and also donated for food. We know a lot of families who need the help.
     
  10. coolcanoechic

    coolcanoechic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Fred's Hens :

    Everyone has to find their own system of managing their flocks, taking into account their enjoyment, their egg business should they have one, and the cost/benefit ratio of the flock. Feed costs are skyrocketing and shows no signs of retreating anytime soon. Your breeder follows his plan.

    We cull three times. The first is after 3 months of laying. Those that lay well stick around while those who few who might lay poorly are culled. We cull again before first moult. Only the very best hens are retained for a second laying season. It is also at this point that breeders are also selected. After a second season of laying, all the remainder are culled. We always have young pullets coming along. 2/3 of our winter flock is always first year layers, assuring production for our customers.

    We have folks anxious for our culled hens, at whatever stage. The are sold for small flocks and also donated for food. We know a lot of families who need the help.

    I guess when you have a large flock, it is easier not to get attached to them. I am hoping that I will not get too attached. There are only three of them. I thought it would be good to start that way and learn the basics first, before trying anything else.​
     

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