Where can I order Buff Orpingtons?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by farmgirl85, May 6, 2008.

  1. farmgirl85

    farmgirl85 New Egg

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    May 6, 2008
    I'm totally new to this forum (my very first post ever!), and almost as new to chickens.
    We have 6 commercial layers right now, but I'd like to add 4 or 5 Buff Orpington hens and a Buff Orpington rooster to that this spring/summer.
    We live in northern Alberta (Canada) and I'm wondering where I can order these birds from and whether I can blend the existing hens with the new arrivals (when they arrive). That way, all the eggs will be fertilized and hopefully at least one of the new hens will decide to go broody.
    My goal is to eventually have just Buff Orpys, the hens raising their young, etc. etc. If I'm being too idealistic, please tell me so! [​IMG]
    If someone can help me out with some answers to this rookie's questions, I'd be very glad!
     
  2. midget_farms

    midget_farms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 15, 2008
    Dunlap Illinois
    Welcome to the chicken club! You and I have the same type of interests. I too want to get a flock of Buff Orps. I have to say they are very hard to come by in anything other than an egg or a day old chick.

    You will see many posted here, but shipping is hard & not many are willing to put an adult bird through that, or for that matter pay the $40 to ship a $5 bird. Sorry.

    I kept at it here though & found a nice guy who sold me some started birds (6 weeks old) I should get them next week. I can't wait. You can also try local livestock auctions. We have one near me every Friday. Ask around & I bet you can find one near you.

    As far as mixing your flock. There are a couple things to keep in mind. First - the introduction. If you just release your new birds into the pen with the existing flock they will be in big trouble. The established flock will not want the competition around.

    So how do you do it. - Chickens don't understand change. When ever something major changes they kind of reset.

    Try placing the new birds & existing birds together (at night when they are most calm) into an entirely new location (garage works, or different enclosure) for a few days so they are all on even ground. No established flock defending the place.

    Then move them (at night again) to the regular home. They may tussle a bit as they work out the pecking order, but that is normal.

    It's not normal if they kill each other. Your buff O's are pretty calm birds from what I hear & they should have no problems getting on, but industrial layers are not bread for personality. So be wary.

    Search the for sale section here - I recall there was a guy with a couple of buff roos to give away.

    Second thing to keep in mind is housing. I've been warned not to get too many birds. I know I will have a real hard time of this myself. They need lots of indoor space, especially if your winters are cold. Make sure your coop is large enough for your entire flock, & consider the worst weather. Winter & summer.

    Other than that just be patient & you will find your birds. It may take some time, but people are always moving & trying different things & eventually you will find what you want.

    Good luck & welcome again.
     
  3. chick_a_rama

    chick_a_rama Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2008
    go to www.ideal-poultry.com

    they have almost all poultry!!![​IMG] (except buff orpington pullets):mad:[​IMG]:|
    if u want dark eggs u should get cuckoo marans
     
  4. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    I love my Buff Orpingtons. I think you will be happy with them. They are wonderful birds. I have 2 broodies right now and I bought mine last summer as day old chicks. they're good egg layers too. Mine starting laying in the freezing cold part of winter. I think all their fluffy feathers helps keep them warm.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2008

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