Which one should I get/do?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Augustus, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. Augustus

    Augustus In the Brooder

    16
    48
    38
    Apr 16, 2019
    Western Kentucky

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
  2. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

    6,087
    43,730
    1,122
    Jul 23, 2018
    Apalachin, NY
    My Coop
    Build! It is always better to build.
     
    Aunt Angus likes this.
  3. ChibiandSpike

    ChibiandSpike In the Brooder

    3
    5
    11
    Apr 21, 2019
    I would build too, you would also be able to test how safe and secure it is if you build. We bought a coop offline and it was totally scaled wrong and much smaller that it couldn’t fit with our chickens.
     
    Aunt Angus likes this.
  4. moniquem

    moniquem Crowing

    588
    1,234
    262
    Feb 3, 2013
    washington
    The one purchased will not be big enough for that many chickens.
     
  5. danceswithronin

    danceswithronin Crowing

    1,173
    2,568
    266
    May 24, 2018
    Alabama
    Build your own. I bought one of those little prefab coops last summer when I started raising chickens and in a week or two I'll be ripping it down to build a proper 8x8' chicken house in its place. It was about the quality you'd expect for the price you pay - flimsy, not very waterproof, and small. Way too small to add on to your flock whatsoever, which trust me, almost everybody ends up doing at some point or another.

    It was adequate for four bantam silkies but no way could you comfortably fit more than like, three standard size layers in it, tops. And even then it'd probably be cramped. Unless you were raising bantams literally in a fenced-in backyard where you don't really have to worry about predators, I wouldn't recommend it at all because a raccoon will rip the hinges off this thing like it's nothing. I replaced the original hardware

    If I had it to do over again, I would not buy a cheap prefab coop. Waste of effort and money, because now I'm going to have to build all over again AND figure out how to house my chickens while I do it.
     
    Aunt Angus and blackdog043 like this.
  6. Toothpick

    Toothpick Songster

    263
    351
    126
    Aug 15, 2016
    TN
    Another vote for build. My first coop was one from tractor supply. I think it was even that one you attached. It’s terrible. It’s like a piece of IKEA furniture out in the yard. Cheap construction that will require modifications within one season to keep it in use. A couple doors have fallen off already and the back window is gone, also the trim is popping off. $200 bucks you might get 2 seasons out of it before you start noticing it falling apart.

    Build you own!!
     
    Aunt Angus and blackdog043 like this.
  7. Mybackyardpeepers

    Mybackyardpeepers Songster

    731
    2,482
    227
    Mar 22, 2019
    Michigan
    I puchased a coop says holds 8 chickens, NOT! I am now in the process of building a bigger one. Mine looks similar to what you posted too.
     
  8. blackdog043

    blackdog043 Crowing

    1,827
    2,554
    316
    Feb 19, 2017
    Charlotte, NC
    Build it, you won't be sorry later! Even if you spend more now, you won't be rebuilding in a couple years.
     
    Aunt Angus and Mybackyardpeepers like this.
  9. Aunt Angus

    Aunt Angus Crowing

    1,230
    3,087
    332
    Jul 16, 2018
    Sacramento County, CA
    My Coop
    I agree: build. It's a lot of work (especially if you're a noob like I am who has very few tools/materials), but you will end up having to make many improvements to a prefab to make it big enough, safe enough, and weatherproof enough anyway.

    I built mine. I used recycled fencing, materials I bought cheap off Craigslist, stuff I had in the garage, and "oops" paint from Home Depot. Only things I bought were hardware, hardware cloth, and my big expense - metal roofing panels. I spent around $250 for a very sturdy and kinda cute 4 x 8 coop that I know is pretty predator proof and stays bone dry in rain storms. Granted, nothing lines up and none of the angles are 90°. But it's all mine and easy to modify.

    Build. You won't be sorry!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: