Which quail breed is best?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Westcoaster87, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. Westcoaster87

    Westcoaster87 Out Of The Brooder

    There are two main species carried in our area- bobwhites and coturnix quails.

    I have an unexplainable preference for the bobwhites however I know very little about either breed.




    What are their temperaments like? How large are each breed?

    Why do people seem to only eat the bobwhite breast? If handled daily as chicks, are the bobwhites less flighty as adults?


    Any info would help :)
     
  2. The Farm

    The Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    961
    38
    118
    Oct 16, 2013
    Luther, OK
    There temperament is normally flighty. But if they are handed then they are young yes they will be more layed back. They are not very big at all. I am not sure about the there ???s
     
  3. Westcoaster87

    Westcoaster87 Out Of The Brooder

    How big are they in comparison to the cortunix quails? We want them for meat and enjoyment.

    Does anyone have any experience with the taste between the two birds? I have read that cortunix is very dark meat while bobwhites is white meat- is that right? How do they compare in size to each other?
     
  4. The Farm

    The Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    961
    38
    118
    Oct 16, 2013
    Luther, OK
    I think they are the same but not for sure. Any one else???
     
  5. teradragon

    teradragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Texas A&M are renowned for mainly white meat, which is why I hatched some... a good few weeks off processing any yet though. They are a breed of jumbo cortunix (I think)..
     
  6. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

    32,229
    5,544
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    Bobwhites are about the same size as Coturnix. As for which breed to keep, it depends on what you want to do with them. Coturnix quail mature very fast and will be ready to lay at 8 or 9 weeks old. Where as Bobwhites take 6 months or more to start laying. Coturnix quail are kept in harems, 1 male to 5 or 6 females, where as Bobs are kept 1 male to 1 female. Coturnix can get by with 1 or 2 square feet per bird, where as Bobs need a minimum of 4 square feet per bird. Coturnix can be handled with minimal stress, Bobwhites panic and can stress heavily, depending on how they were raised. Coturnix are calmer over all, Bobwhites are known to flush easily.

    But as far as beauty, calling and over all intelligence, I am all for the Bobwhite. [​IMG]
     
  7. Westcoaster87

    Westcoaster87 Out Of The Brooder

    Oooooo, now you see, that is what I keep thinking when it comes to the bobwhite. They are just so beautiful and they make such a wonderful call.

    It sounds then that the Coturnix is the better quail for a first-time quail owner. Space is not an issue for us though so we could bring in the Coturnix and then start a small flock of bobwhites later on.
     
  8. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I hate to burst any bubbles but any coturnix including the A&M are dark meat. I'm not sure where the white meat misconception came from but a cot is a cot a cot and and they all have dark meat. Bobwhites and Chukars have white breast meat.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  9. nayeli

    nayeli Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,986
    96
    196
    Jan 18, 2014
    It seems pretty simple from the responses that if your wanting quail for meat rather than pets you shouldn't get the bobs..
     
  10. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Not quite. It depends on the meat you want. Refer to my last post bobs are white meat breast coturnix are all dark meat. The trade off is you can butcher coturnix from 8 weeks on but bobs will take 16-20 weeks to grow out. Really as far as quail for pets go coturnix are much easier to gentle. As TwoCrows said bobs tend to flush more and more aloof in general. They take more work to be tamed. I wouldn't recommend trying to tame northern bobwhites for a first timer but some bobwhite mutations aren't too bad.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by