Which Rooster should I get? LC Orp or SLW?

Kasey

Chirping
6 Years
Feb 10, 2013
290
10
91
Waco, TX
I am going Tuesday to pick up a young cockerel for my eight 11 week old pullets.


I can choose from two silver laced Wyandottes or a lemon cukoo Orpington.


I'd liked to get something that will mix well with my flocks temperament and breeds. I have 3 Barred Rocks, 3 Easter Eggers and 2 buff Orpingtons.


I also want something that's gonna have a good disposition with people as well.


How do these two breeds compare? Should I stay away from either?
 

WalkingOnSunshine

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 8, 2008
4,210
516
328
Ohio
There's no real way to answer this question for you. Picking up a young rooster is going to be a gamble. Rooster temperament is far more a result of the genetic line rather than breed, and they don't show their true temperament until they're a year old or so--especially in terms of whether they will be human-aggressive or not. Right now, for example, I have a four year old hatchery Rhode Island Red. They are supposed to be terribly aggressive. Mine's never put a foot wrong. Think of roosters like Pit Bulls--it's all genetics and handling, and you can't stereotype the animal based on breed. (I have a sweet Pit Bull, too.)

As far as flock temperament based on breeds, for the most part, chickens is chickens-- and the breeds you mix don't matter in the slightest.

Pick the rooster that looks healthy and, if they are out where you can see them, one that seems at least polite to the hens (not grabbing them and mating them without doing the dance first). If one acts aggressively towards you, don't pick that one.

If you plan to hatch eggs, remember that this rooster will have a huge impact on your future flock. If you care about laying ability, choose one from a line of good layers (especially watch the Opr--often the more exotic colors of Orps don't lay very well). If you care about looks, choose one that you like the look of. Etc. Etc.
 
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Kasey

Chirping
6 Years
Feb 10, 2013
290
10
91
Waco, TX
There's no real way to answer this question for you. Picking up a young rooster is going to be a gamble. Rooster temperament is far more a result of the genetic line rather than breed, and they don't show their true temperament until they're a year old or so--especially in terms of whether they will be human-aggressive or not. Right now, for example, I have a four year old hatchery Rhode Island Red. They are supposed to be terribly aggressive. Mine's never put a foot wrong. Think of roosters like Pit Bulls--it's all genetics and handling, and you can't stereotype the animal based on breed. (I have a sweet Pit Bull, too.)

As far as flock temperament based on breeds, for the most part, chickens is chickens-- and the breeds you mix don't matter in the slightest.

Pick the rooster that looks healthy and, if they are out where you can see them, one that seems at least polite to the hens (not grabbing them and mating them without doing the dance first). If one acts aggressively towards you, don't pick that one.

If you plan to hatch eggs, remember that this rooster will have a huge impact on your future flock. If you care about laying ability, choose one from a line of good layers (especially watch the Opr--often the more exotic colors of Orps don't lay very well). If you care about looks, choose one that you like the look of. Etc. Etc.


Thank you for your reply. I understand what you mean about the temperament/handling etc.

Do you think it will help that I will get to see the roosters that they are out of as well?

They sound like they are fairly gentle and I interact with my pullets very often so hopefully that will help.

I like the looks of both breed types so it truely doesn't matter on that part to me. I will definitely be on the look out for the things you mentioned.

Thanks again!
 

WalkingOnSunshine

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 8, 2008
4,210
516
328
Ohio
Thank you for your reply. I understand what you mean about the temperament/handling etc.

Do you think it will help that I will get to see the roosters that they are out of as well?

They sound like they are fairly gentle and I interact with my pullets very often so hopefully that will help.

I like the looks of both breed types so it truely doesn't matter on that part to me. I will definitely be on the look out for the things you mentioned.

Thanks again!
If you have the chance, I would definitely look at the father of the roosters and watch him interact with the hens. That would be a great way to see if the parent is a gentleman, which gives you a better chance of having the son be a gentleman. Picking your rooster based on which parent rooster you like best might be a great way to do it.

If I could suggest--don't make friends with whichever rooster you choose. Remember that he is an animal and sees the world very differently than you do. If you let him sit on your lap or shoulder, you are telling him directly in bird language that he is the boss of you. Then if you're walking in the chicken yard, he may attack you because he'll feel that you're not treating him with the proper deference. Instead, YOU be the boss rooster. Roosters are not for cuddles--you have hens for that. Ideally, you want a bird that does not run panicked from you when you walk towards him, and will come to you for treats when you call, but does move away from you when you walk towards him. You don't have to do anything special except leave him a little more wild than your hens. If he does come at you aggressively--head low, neck feathers fluffed out--squawk at the top of your lungs and chase him around the yard and flap your arms and either kick him (hard) or grab him and hold him upside down and carry him around and remind him that you are the boss. If you don't allow even the first aggressive look, you may stop his bid for supremacy in it's tracks. We had exactly one episode with our big RIR where he thought he might be the boss of me when he was young. He never tried it again, which is good, since we have a two strikes policy for roosters: once, and you get chased and grabbed, twice, and you lose your head by sunset. Flog me, and you don't even get a second chance. Roosters can be dangerous (I have a friend who almost lost an eye to a rooster as a child) so remember that they are the same as stallions or bulls--they need a bit of wariness and special handling, no matter how gentle they are.
 
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Melabella

Crowing
8 Years
Jun 2, 2011
5,343
214
291
I am going Tuesday to pick up a young cockerel for my eight 11 week old pullets.


I can choose from two silver laced Wyandottes or a lemon cukoo Orpington.


I'd liked to get something that will mix well with my flocks temperament and breeds. I have 3 Barred Rocks, 3 Easter Eggers and 2 buff Orpingtons.


I also want something that's gonna have a good disposition with people as well.


How do these two breeds compare? Should I stay away from either?
I just rehomed a Columbian Wyandotte roo that was meaner than mean. Luckily found a free range farm up here that has over 250 hens, and he had more than enough work to keep him busy. I realize that one rooster does not make a determination on a breed, but as WalkingOnSunshine stated, don't look to be friends with a roo, a healthy respect is more like it. I tried and tried to keep that rooster, as he was fierce at protecting girls, and was the ultimate caretaker, yet, we could not walk out of the barn into the free range area without getting chased, flown up at, and flogged. Easter Sunday he flew up in my 5 year old nieces face, and that sealed his fate. he is lucky the free range farm took him, or it was to the soup pot! His replacement is not a friendly one, but he respects my presence and quickly moves away. He also dosesn't mind if I handle the girls. Two things that are a must. I would try to pick up one of his girls and see how he does. How old is the cockrel? I have heard Orpingtons are fairly docile. Good Luck, and let us know what you picked!
 

Kasey

Chirping
6 Years
Feb 10, 2013
290
10
91
Waco, TX
Thank you! I definitely don't plan on making friends with this rooster and have been doing as much research on roosters as possible before getting him. I'm not sure which I will get and I will probably just go on which one seems the healthiest and most respectful. And I definitely won't put up with aggressiveness! I have no place for an aggressive bird.

And on the age questions, they are supposed to be around the same age as my girls. So almost 3 months or so.
 

WalkingOnSunshine

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 8, 2008
4,210
516
328
Ohio
Thank you! I definitely don't plan on making friends with this rooster and have been doing as much research on roosters as possible before getting him. I'm not sure which I will get and I will probably just go on which one seems the healthiest and most respectful. And I definitely won't put up with aggressiveness! I have no place for an aggressive bird.

And on the age questions, they are supposed to be around the same age as my girls. So almost 3 months or so.
Don't forget to add prettiest to your list of considerations! A hen pays for her feed through eggs, but a rooster's contribution is more intangible. To my mind, there are five reasons to keep them and if they don't measure up in any of these areas, they have to go:

1. Kind to hens. Rough roosters bring stress.
2. Fertile. Self explanatory.
3. Vigilant. I don't expect him to throw himself to the fox, but I do expect him to sound the alarm and get everyone under cover.
4. Break up hen fights before too many feathers are pulled
5. Be good to look at. Masculine beauty.

So that means, I probably wouldn't keep an ugly rooster no matter how well he did his job. Something to think about.
 
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Kasey

Chirping
6 Years
Feb 10, 2013
290
10
91
Waco, TX
e2e4u6as.jpg


Meet Jalapeño the SLW!!!

All the birds seemed to be in great condition. His father was HUGE!! I would have guessed him at at least 10-15lbs.

He was the one that stuck out to me the most. So now he is the proud rooster of 8 hens!
 

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