Which Way to slant the roof

Leigti

Crowing
7 Years
Oct 22, 2015
1,700
622
266
Walla Walla WA
I have looked at many different coop designs. Most of them have a slanted roof either towards the front or towards the back. Is it just preference or is there a reason to do it one way or the other? My coupe will be 4 feet high not counting the roof. Any suggestions?
 
I have looked at many different coop designs. Most of them have a slanted roof either towards the front or towards the back. Is it just preference or is there a reason to do it one way or the other? My coupe will be 4 feet high not counting the roof. Any suggestions?

Mine is part of an all in one coop run, slanted it on the back side to offer taller entry for humans and better view of the flock from my house. Lucked up and the lower part of the roof faces the prevailing winds - a great help to for the flock during winter and summer storms.

So, IMO place the lower edge toward the prevailing wind direction in your location.
 
I would slant the roof, so that the lower portion is away from the door you and chickens use to enter. helps keep that area not as wet, and less muddy that if all the rainwater or heavy heavy dew from constantly dripping there.
 
Following on what Berts said, you don’t want water dripping on you as you are gathering eggs or trying to feed or water them. You don’t want water running into the run or where you normally walk if it can get muddy. You might be able to achieve this by which way the roof slopes or you can use a gutter and downspout.

You do want the roof to slope. A flat roof will leak, rot, or rust.
 
I will also add, depending on what you use for roofing material, will help determine what pitch, or slope you need to put on the roof.
 
Definitely take account of wind direction and to aid in drainage. Depending on where you are consider min pitch of 3" for every foot if you get snow accumulations.
 
Thanks everybody. I will take it all into consideration. I can't wait to get this chicken coop built.
Sometimes site and maintenance orientation does not match prevailing winds and water runoff aspects.
You do the best planning you can and finagle the rest.
 
I'm going to have the high part of the roof in the front sloping down to the back. So the roof should be at about 5 feet in the front and four in the back. With a six inch overhang all the way around. And the whole coop will be about 30 inches off the ground. Obviously not a walk in coop. But I think this will allow me to put lots of ventilation above the chickens heads when they're on the roosts. Nest boxes on the outside of one end. I will probably also have a covered run attached to the other end with the roof slanted the same way.
The prevailing wind will mostly be hitting the side of the coop. Not much I can do about that. I want the front facing east so that they get good sunlight in the morning.
And I'm thinking I will plow bubbly use the PVC or plastic roofing. Does it cause less condensation than metal? And what about heat? How does it compare with regular asphalt shingles? Sorry for all the questions. But I want to try to get this right from the beginning :) easier to make changes on paper then during the build itself.
 

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