White Feather?

Mountain Peeps

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Hi everyone! Sorry I keep asking about Rosie, but is this white feather on the end of her wing normal? Does it indicate something?? She has it on both sides and has had it since she was like two weeks old.



 

chooks4life

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Apr 8, 2013
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Yes, it does indicate something: how marvelously specific genetic influences can be. ;) I find the subject fascinating. Which is actually one major reason why I breed mongrels and not purebred or crossbred anythings.

I've had mongrels/mutts who regularly passed on very specific traits such as having the fourth covert feather on each wing part white, part black, and part striped, and the rest of the wing feathers another color. I also had one whose offspring always had only one white feather on one wing, always the exact same feather too.

If you learn more about chicken genetics you will learn exactly why that feather on the chook is that color. It isn't random in most cases, it's very specific, and there is a meaning behind it, and other genes represented by it too in many cases, ones which may govern health of a certain body system or organ or be involved in other genetic traits you're seeing over the rest of the body --- or not seeing. It's all interlinked. Everything means something and everything is connected.

'Points' are caused by recessive genes in some animals and dominant in other species. In felines, such as Ragdoll cats or Siamese, the dark face, tail, paws etc are due to a recessive gene. Interestingly though it's common enough in ferals and Florida panthers for example are somewhat 'pointed'. But 'points' can be white, or any other color.

A book on chicken genetics may seem daunting if you're not very 'into' it, or not much of a reader, but some of them are accessible to the layperson and I think you may find it a very interesting and worthwhile investment. But there are websites providing the same or equivalent info too.

Best wishes.
 

Mountain Peeps

Jesus is my life
Premium member
5 Years
Apr 23, 2014
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Yes, it does indicate something: how marvelously specific genetic influences can be. ;) I find the subject fascinating. Which is actually one major reason why I breed mongrels and not purebred or crossbred anythings.

I've had mongrels/mutts who regularly passed on very specific traits such as having the fourth covert feather on each wing part white, part black, and part striped, and the rest of the wing feathers another color. I also had one whose offspring always had only one white feather on one wing, always the exact same feather too.

If you learn more about chicken genetics you will learn exactly why that feather on the chook is that color. It isn't random in most cases, it's very specific, and there is a meaning behind it, and other genes represented by it too in many cases, ones which may govern health of a certain body system or organ or be involved in other genetic traits you're seeing over the rest of the body --- or not seeing. It's all interlinked. Everything means something and everything is connected.

'Points' are caused by recessive genes in some animals and dominant in other species. In felines, such as Ragdoll cats or Siamese, the dark face, tail, paws etc are due to a recessive gene. Interestingly though it's common enough in ferals and Florida panthers for example are somewhat 'pointed'. But 'points' can be white, or any other color.

A book on chicken genetics may seem daunting if you're not very 'into' it, or not much of a reader, but some of them are accessible to the layperson and I think you may find it a very interesting and worthwhile investment. But there are websites providing the same or equivalent info too.

Best wishes.
Wow!! Thank you!! I just thought it was normal. Your post was very fascinating. So just to be clear it doesn't mean she is a he or that something is wrong, right? Thanks again for you knowledge on this
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,905
655
296
Australia
Wow!! Thank you!! I just thought it was normal. Your post was very fascinating. So just to be clear it doesn't mean she is a he or that something is wrong, right? Thanks again for you knowledge on this
You're welcome. :)

Nothing is wrong, it's quite normal. It may not be correct for the breed itself, possibly, I don't know because I don't know what breed she is, but I know of no genetic disorders attached to this coloration at this place on the body.

Best wishes.
 

Mountain Peeps

Jesus is my life
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You're welcome. :)

Nothing is wrong, it's quite normal. It may not be correct for the breed itself, possibly, I don't know because I don't know what breed she is, but I know of no genetic disorders attached to this coloration at this place on the body.

Best wishes.
Thanks again!!!
 
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