White Rock Growing Tips?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by COgirl, May 3, 2011.

  1. COgirl

    COgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 6, 2007
    Falcon Colorado
    I have 60 White Rock roos coming in the end of May. We can't raise the Cx's due to altitude... From what I have read here, I'm looking at 20 -24 weeks of growing I believe, I plan on starting with unmedicated starter (they will be sprayed at the hatchery for coccidiosis) my question is should I start with game bird starter or just reg chick starter? Also will Flock Raiser be sufficent for the remainder? My biggest fear is 60/2lb roos at the end of Oct, while I don't expect nor want huge birds I would like at least 3.5 to 4lb. They will have the ability to range and will also get goodies from the garden. Any tips for plump white rocks at processing time would be greatly appreciated.....
     
  2. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Quote:I admire your goals but I also fear your setting yourself up for disappointment on a few front's. Getting WR's from a hatchery is the first problem, I suspect you have read their wonderful bio on the WR in the catalog. Saying how they are fast growers, good dual purpose meat/egg birds, and are ready to process at 20-24 wks. All hogwash is what it is IMO, I raise both WR's ( non hatchery mutt's ) and meat birds so I think I have some valid points. You say you don't want or expect large birds, that's good cause your not going to get that, you also fear that when the time rolls around your birds will be scrawney and have to raise all those roosters to crowing age and have to deal with tough gamey tasting meat due to hormone production kicking in after 24 wks. Not to mention managing 60 roosters all together. Feed to meat ratio will be un thrifty due to your high protien feed bill, what you see will be more fluff than meat, these birds will put on all bone growth first then begin to form muscle meat. If you want a finished boney carcass at around 2.5lbs @ 30 wks that should be fine, High protien feed from the start would be your only option not chick starter to get the most bang for your buck. Perhaps going another route besides hatchery junk you get you a much better result. BTW I hope your good at processing and have done that before as it needs to be your first consideration when raising birds for meat.
     
  3. QCFChicks

    QCFChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 19, 2011
    Wow that was kinda harsh think she was looking for a litttle more advise than a brow beating for buying what you call "hatchery mutts". I agree that sixty if, if this is your first time, is a bit much for a first time I started with 4 for my first time. My question to you is out of all that is your, obviously professional, opinion to use high protien feed through out the entire process?
     
  4. punky rooster

    punky rooster Awesome

    Jul 21, 2010
    Quote:Its the truth though.
    I agree that sixty if, if this is your first time, is a bit much for a first time I started with 4 for my first time. My question to you is out of all that is your, obviously professional, opinion to use high protien feed through out the entire process?

    I do not understand your question. I think you are asking why use high protein feed, am I correct?​
     
  5. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Facing the reality and the truth is much more kind than supporting a sugar coated idea of what the hatchery is trying to peddle. I want the OP to succeed at her goal and go about that goal in the best way she can. The high protien feed suggestion is what I would use to optimize her limited growth potential. I just don't buy the line of bull the hatcheries shovel to the unsuspecting unknowing but noble buyer, and that's fact whether your a ............................... Oh forget it anyway !!!!!
     
  6. COgirl

    COgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 6, 2007
    Falcon Colorado
    Thank you for your opinon al6517. I appreciate the information you have passed on, you addressed my feed concerns. This was a planned 3 family project, so cost would have been spread out among the 3 families but still high I believe. Again not expecting the large weights of X's, I would want at least 3.5 to 4lbs on average.

    Raising the 60 roos wouldn't be that much of an issue, we live in the country, and have ample room and the crowing wouldn't be an issue for that long.

    Processing, again not an issue, while not my favorite chore more than doable, as DH and I process any animal we harvest during hunting season, be it antelope or elk or grouse. Honestly though, I think 60 chickens would be better off going to the processor, but then the cost (3.00 per bird) becomes a factor I understand.

    I suppose raising anything other than Cx's is probably not very cost effective, but I'm certainly not keen on raising an animal that from most accounts simply won't survive to processing age at this altitude.

    Perhaps I will look into Dark Cornish, 2 of my layers are that breed (hatchery mutts thank you) and I remember they grew quickly and have always felt quite meaty to me, my layers are pets so they were never in any danger lol. Again thank you for your input, perhaps my concern of tiny roos may have been well founded eh [​IMG]
     
  7. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Quote:Well it does seem your intentions are well grounded and noble, I too prefer the Standard Cornish for many reason's and that may be more well suited to your goals. You have all the time and space you need to experiment so please do, it's fun and rewarding. I wish you all the best of luck.
     

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