Why are swans so expensive?

ChristineR

Songster
8 Years
Jun 15, 2011
1,782
220
231
WA state
I have a natural pond on my property that covers about an acre. I thought it would be fun to get a pair of swans to add to my ducks. Holy cow! They're so expensive! Why??? Are they hard to breed?

Does anyone know of somewhere to get them for less than thousands of dollars?
 

chickenzoo

Emu Hugger
12 Years
Mar 10, 2008
9,364
220
341
a bumpy dirt road in Florida
If you get them as babies they are less expensive. Look for a breeder near you. It takes a lot of time to raise up the babies.... Lots of greens, lots of care...... I like the Black swans as far as personality and willingness to get along with other birds. They are also the least expensive..... Averaging $150 - $350 each cygnet typically.
 

92caddy

Egg Lover
12 Years
May 18, 2007
1,571
19
171
Portland, IN
They wont start to mate til they are at least 3 years old. They take a higher protein feed wise. They should have lots of greens as well.
 

bockbock2008

Why do they call me crazy??
11 Years
Dec 30, 2008
2,200
19
221
Southwest Indiana
They wont start to mate til they are at least 3 years old. They take a higher protein feed wise. They should have lots of greens as well.

Hi Ed!
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scratch'n'peck

Crowing
12 Years
Oct 31, 2008
5,925
676
401
West Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Mute swans are also regulated in many states by the department of natural resources because they are considered an invasive species, so that effects the supply of mutes some. Some states will not allow you to bring new mute swans into the state. Black swans,BTW, are considered to be exotics and are not regulated by the DNR in most places. Finding a local or smaller breeder will save you a lot of money. Many larger business will buy the swans from smaller breeders and then resell them for more money. Also, swan eggs are more difficult to incubate.

I think the cygnets are pretty cute.
 

smoothmule

Crowing
13 Years
Apr 12, 2008
2,780
171
322
Buffalo, Missouri
In addition to all of this, they are seasonal breeders so it's not like you can raise them year round. And, with some breeds, you have to pay to have them DNA sexed and to be legal, and so your investment doesn't just fly away someday, they have to be pinioned. When you add it all together they are very expensive to raise.
 

ChristineR

Songster
8 Years
Jun 15, 2011
1,782
220
231
WA state
Oh my gosh! That is the sweetest thing ever! What type of cygnet is that?
Mute swans are also regulated in many states by the department of natural resources because they are considered an invasive species, so that effects the supply of mutes some. Some states will not allow you to bring new mute swans into the state. Black swans,BTW, are considered to be exotics and are not regulated by the DNR in most places. Finding a local or smaller breeder will save you a lot of money. Many larger business will buy the swans from smaller breeders and then resell them for more money. Also, swan eggs are more difficult to incubate.

I think the cygnets are pretty cute.
 

Mark HSV-AL

Chirping
8 Years
Oct 5, 2011
91
15
96
Huntsville, AL
The cost of swans and any other bird is usually determined by availability, difficulty of care and difficulty in rearing young. Swans take 4 or 5 years to lay any eggs and when when they do it is a small clutch and then you have to raise these small cygnets to adult sized birds. When taken care of properly they need to be on water as soon as possible so as to avoid bow legs and to attain good feather. This takes a lot of time, effort and patience so the cost is higher than an embden goose which is going to raise every year, lay lots of eggs and is designed to walk on land.
 

ChristineR

Songster
8 Years
Jun 15, 2011
1,782
220
231
WA state
The cost of swans and any other bird is usually determined by availability, difficulty of care and difficulty in rearing young. Swans take 4 or 5 years to lay any eggs and when when they do it is a small clutch and then you have to raise these small cygnets to adult sized birds. When taken care of properly they need to be on water as soon as possible so as to avoid bow legs and to attain good feather. This takes a lot of time, effort and patience so the cost is higher than an embden goose which is going to raise every year, lay lots of eggs and is designed to walk on land.

Ah, then that makes sense why they are so much. I didn't realize they were so much different from other waterfowl. I'll keep my eyes open locally. I would still love to get a pair and I have the ideal place for them on my beaver pond.
 

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