Will I get brown or white eggs

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by what did I do, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. what did I do

    what did I do Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a cross between a Leghorn hen and a Barred Rock rooster will she lay brown or white eggs?
    I also have a rooster from a Leghorn egg and a Barred Rock Rooster, he is white. What kids of eggs will his offspring lay if they are from brown eggs?

    Now I have a TJ Leghorn Rooster, will I get brown or white eggs from his offspring?

    My list of chickens is in my signature.
     
  2. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    the hen should lay white to light brown eggs now on the rooster his off spring if the mama hen lays brown should lay a light brown egg but white still could be possible
     
  3. what did I do

    what did I do Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you :)
     
  4. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    if you blue eggers are pullets they should have blue egger babies when crossed to the leg horn making what people are calling the super blue eggers [​IMG]
     
  5. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    The color of a hens' or roosters ear lobes are a good predictor of egg color. A rooster (or I should say his full sisters) with white or butter milk colored ear lobes lay only white shelled eggs. Red ear lobes on the other hand mean brown or colored egg shells.

    The barred rock cross pullet shown should lay an egg with a shell of one shade or the other of brown. Look at Trevi70's review of white leghorns in the right hand margin on this page. Her white leghorn roo has white ear lobes and all his full sisters will lay white shelled eggs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  6. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

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    not totally true as I have blue ear lobe hens that lay blue eggs
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    White crossed with brown gives light brown, tan or cream. Same for his offspring. I think even if you bred him to a white egg layer--like back to a leghorn--you'd still not get a true white egg.

    Your leghorn roo bred to a white layer will give white egg laying offspring. bred to brown will give light brown.
     
  8. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    I have white-eared EEs that lay blue and green eggs. The ear color gene is not linked to the egg color gene. It just happens that most white-eared breeds lay white eggs and most red-eared breeds lay brown. There are exceptions, though. Pendesencas, for example.
     
  9. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Two brown eyed humans can have a blue eyed child. But two blued eyed parents can't produce a brown eyed baby.
    All this means in chickens is that if there is a blue egg laying hen producing a brown egg laying daughter, that there are wild oats in the hen house.

    A first generation cross between a pure blue egg chicken and a pure brown egg laying rooster will produce 3 blue egg laying hens to each brown egg laying hen (on average as per Mendelssohn's law) and starting after about the second or third generation (without a breeding program in place) it is anyone's guess as to what ratio of blue shelled eggs verses brown shelled eggs you'll get.

    Egg shell color (depth of color) can even vary greatly week to week from say dark brown to light tan.
     
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  10. dretd

    dretd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Speaking of Mendelssohn...

    There is an interesting article that reviews egg color genetics and talks about color inhibiting genes--genes that sit around the blue or brown color gene and suppress or decrease the degree that the color is expressed so a blue may be more pale or brighter blue depending on if the chicken carried one of these color inhibiting genes.

    Here is a link that discusses the color inhibiting genes: http://marans.org/eggreview.pdf

    In a nutshell, both blue and brown pigments are governed by dominant genes. If a chicken lacks both of these genes, it will lay a white-shelled egg. A chicken will inherit one copy of each gene from each parent for a total of 2 genes. For instance, if a hen lays blue eggs she must have at least one copy of the blue gene and maybe two. If a rooster comes from blue-egg laying parents he will also (most probably) carry the blue gene. If the white egg layer has a color-inhibiting gene, the expected light brown egg from a whitexbrown cross might be very pale.

    Interesting stuff.
     
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