Wolf or Coyote urine. Does it really work?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by riomurphy, Feb 4, 2012.

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  1. riomurphy

    riomurphy In the Brooder

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    We have just discovered fox tracks in our yard. The neighbors have alerted us to seeing one roaming our back yards. Other than shooting it ( my 1st choice ), I have agreed with the family, to find a better way to keep it off our property before resorting to killing it. I was told that wolf or coyote urine is a good option. Has anyone tried this, and does it work? The old saying of a "sly fox" comes to mind - and it will find another way into the chickens. If you have had any luck (good or bad) with the urine trick, I would love to hear about it. I will try other options first before I apply, the big bang theory! ;)
     

  2. fc

    fc In the Brooder

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    From hunting magazines I've read that urine is urine is urine. From a medical perspective though, I can tell you that what something eats can affect the odor of urine. If what I've read is true, dog urine may smell no different than coyote urine.
     
  3. chigger bait

    chigger bait Chirping

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    We have both foxes and coyotes pass over our place.

    Both mark their territory freely and doesn't seem to deter the other.

    Coyotes will kill and eat foxes if given the chance.

    I know they have gotten fat off of house cats and dogs around here.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Crowing

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    Urine may even ATTRACT them rather than repel them
     
  5. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Crowing Premium Member

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    X2 I personally think it could make things a lot worse especially using the wolf urine.
     

  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Coyote urine will get attention of red fox if fox recognizes what scent is from. In most areas fox does know what a coyote is and realizes such a critter is to be avoided as it will pursue you with considerble effort.

    Gray wolf urine will get attention of red fox if fox recognizes what scent is from. In most areas fox does not know what a gray wolf is and without prior experience will not come to recognize such as a threat. Even when gray wolf encountered it is not a apt to pursue you like a coyote will. You still want to be carefull and not push your luck.

    Human urine does not work on coyotes or foxes, at least mine does not. It attracts oppossums. Racoons appear to have figured out this apes urine can indicate a critter is large and fully capable of chasing you up a tree and knocking you out where now a dog will be waiting below.

    Dog (domestic gray wolf) urine does and can be helpful if dog can chase fox. My dog (intact male) now scent marks which fox and coyotes take note of. Local coyotes avoid, inpart because they know my dog will chase and attempt to whoop on them. Darn foxes probably think like my dog is a gray wolf that is not a major threat unless he is close by and able to get at you. My dog is both and eager to go after fox. Fox still probes but dog usually engages when chickens sound alarm. In contrast my brother kept several coonhounds penned seperately in cockyard. Coyotes would not visit but red foxes would come in and go after free-ranging juveniles and stay just out of reach of the chained hounds. To resolve problem, a single hound was allowed to roam and cockyard and fox could no longer hunt without risk.


    Urine of scent marking is very informative. It identifies species, gender and reproductive status. It can also indicate individual indentity, overall health and sometimes nutritional status. Predators with overlapping ranges very likely know each other as individuals, even across species boundaries. Scent quality may be a away that a potential upsurper asseses whether it is worth risk of challenging a territory holder. Appears to be case in wild felines.
     
  7. chigger bait

    chigger bait Chirping

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    I wonder about buck urine?

    I saw a doe with 2 yearing fawns thrash the living daylights out of a coyote on my place, the year before last, during rifle season.

    He left the property with his ears laid back, after burners lit, and the doe was hot on his tail.
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Crowing

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    Quote: Urine is pretty much urine, in that it is largely water and uric acid.

    Within a very short time, the urea starts to break down into Ammonia, and it all ends up smelling pretty much the same.

    As a repellent, it's just not worth the effort
     
  9. chigger bait

    chigger bait Chirping

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    True.

    More so in warmer weather.

    I just noticed when I had a dip bag over a mock scrap, I didn't have as many coyotes in the area.

    When I had just doe pee out the coyotes would bed in the tall cover, just a few feet from it.
     

  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    That is not correct.

    Urine of mammals is water, urea, salts, small amounts of amino acids and pheromones. Pheromones are the part used for communitication. Uric acid is the form of nitrogen typical of birds and most reptiles.
     
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