Wormer, preventative deworming

farm-gal91

Chirping
7 Years
Sep 28, 2012
123
4
94
What wormers do you all use as a preventative, maintenence dewormer for your flock?
Where do you get these wormers and are they labeled for chickens?
 

gritsar

Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!
13 Years
Nov 9, 2007
28,906
336
661
SW Arkansas
I normally use valbazen (albendazole), a cattle/sheep wormer used off label for chickens. I worm in November, when egg production is down anyhow so less eggs to throw away.

This year I found a mites on one hen in one coop, my serama coop, so I switched and used ivermection pour-on, which kills external and internal pests.

The valbazen I get at our local feedstore. In these hard times I didn't want to ask my cattle farmer neighbor for a syringe-full of the ivomec (even though a syringe full is only a drop in the bucket to him), so I ordered a small bottle from jefferslivestock: http://www.jefferspet.com/iver-on-pour-on/camid/LIV/cp/0026251/

Next year I'll go back to the valbazen.
 
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dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
28,036
15,094
956
Glen St Mary, Florida

JulyBlizzard

In the Brooder
7 Years
Sep 19, 2012
42
15
41
Looks like I am in need of a dewormer. I would like to try to confirm the gape worm first. I have been looking into verm-x but I am just looking for some proof of it's ability, i.e. I know for fact my chickens had worms, I used this and it worked I am so happy now type of thing. But so far just sort ofs or people who use it to prevent.


I understand that the chemicals can work but I want natural solutions. People have surely always had these issues in the past. I am trying to see where the balance is messed up so I can right it. Otherwise what am I doing besides seeing one problem then the next and the next. But maybe there is a larger problem? I just don't get why there would not be a greater built in resistance by birds who are going to eat snails, earthworms etc.

I wish there were easier answers.
 

TXchickmum

Crowing
8 Years
Apr 21, 2012
2,843
364
271
North Texas
-recently had one hen with tapeworm (as apparent from the segments shed in the droppings). -treated with Verm-x, and have seen a significant difference. -only a few segments in her droppings after several days of treatment. Yesterday, I found nothing. I scoop the coop, daily, and the lawn and run multiple times per day. -seems to work. -that being said, if I see any signs to the contrary I won't hesitate to order some Valbazen. My hen looks healthy, is laying daily, and is very active. She seems fine. -BUT, if segments return to the droppings, she'll be treated to eliminate the issue. -don't intend to lose a hen to somehing that is treatable. (I always preference natural, first, but will do what's necessary to preserve my flock.)
 

Bear Foot Farm

Crowing
11 Years
Mar 31, 2008
5,543
309
288
Grifton NC
Quote: If you want "built in resistance" in your flock, start breeding them for several generations, and let all the sick birds die.
The ones that survive are the resistant ones
 

crazyhen

Crowing
11 Years
Aug 26, 2008
3,196
101
264
mtns of ,NC.
Or the birds could be carriers and infect every new bird you bring in. Just because a bird survives does not make it a healthy bird to have around. Gloria Jean
 

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