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wazine - Page 4

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaeJean View Post

Hi Kathy, I recently came across one of your replies to a post on Wazine 17. You posted some pictures in response to an inquiry about identifying worms. Apparently the gal you responded to said her worms did not look like the ones in your pictures. But mine do, and I couldn't find where you identified them. As a novice in raising chickens ( and now experiencing my first worm infestation) I don't know what type they are. Could you please enlighten me? I treated with Strike III last week, treating 11 hens for 4 days (withholding eggs for 3 days thereafter). Today was day 3 after treatment and while the infestation has greatly decreased, I still see the white worms in the poop so I went to the feed store and purchased Wazine 17, hoping that will do the trick. A little bummed though that recommendation for withholding eggs is 14-17 days after treatment. Appreciate any info. RaeJean

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaeJean View Post

I came across your post about using Wazine 17 for your first use in de-worming your flock. I find myself now in your position and am new to this issue. How did the Wazine work out for your flock? Did you treat in the water only 1 day or multiple consecutive days? How long did you withhold eggs? RaeJean

Welcome to BYC! Google chicken roundworm and see if that's what you saw. If that's what you saw, then treat with the Wazine.

-Kathy
post #32 of 37

Thanks Kathy for the quick reply.  I Googled chicken roundworms per your suggestion.  From what I read, Wazine is  "not" for use in laying hens only meat chickens.  This is contrary from what I have read on other posts on Backyard Chicken, where wazine is suggested.  Now, I'm confused.  Will Wazine absorb into the egg?  If so, and assuming it is okay to use it on my laying hens, how long should I wait before eating the eggs?  


Edited by RaeJean - 1/19/16 at 4:54pm
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaeJean View Post
 

Thanks Kathy for the quick reply.  I Googled chicken roundworms per your suggestion.  From what I read, Wazine is  "not" for use in laying hens only meat chickens.  This is contrary from what I have read on other posts on Backyard Chicken, where wazine is suggested.  Now, I'm confused.  Will Wazine absorb into the egg?  If so, and assuming it is okay to use it on my laying hens, how long should I wait before eating the eggs?  

Most people just wait 14 days to eat the eggs. 

 

-Kathy

post #34 of 37

Well I did a little more research.  The first site I reviewed was from US Davis, not recommending Wazine for laying hens.  But then I found other sites contradicting that.  So I am going to use it and hope for the best.  I may have to take a sample to the vet for identification.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasakat View Post

There are a lot of worming products on the market and many of us tend to balk at using them because they usually have a disclaimer stating not to consume eggs for 14 days after administering the final dose. Well, crums! Who wants to chuck out beautiful eggs for 24 days? (First dose, followed by a final dose 10 days later). I just picked up a bottle of Wazine - a very safe and highly effective anti-wormer - and was basically resigned to tossing out a huge number of eggs. Then, I did a little research, and I thought I would share what I found out.

The active ingredient in Wazine is piperazine. Among other things, piperazine is used to treat intestinal parasitic infections in chickens, pigs, dogs, and HUMANS. Dosage for humans is as follows: 6g taken orally for 1 day followed 10 days later by a second 6g dose for adults. For children 8 to 14 years old, the dosage is reduced to 4 g. For children 2 to 8, the dosage is 2 grams. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/piperazine-oral-route/proper-use/drg-20065522)

When given to laying hens at a dosage of 300mg/kg body weight, piperazine was found in the eggs at a highest concentration of 0.8mg twenty-four hours after the hen was medicated, and then at 0.2mg ninety-six hours after the hen was medicated (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?sid=24898556&viewopt=Deposited.) For folks who don't remember, there are 1000 mg in a single gram, so the smallest dosage used to treat a 2-year-old is 2000 mg. Given this information, I wondered why the product warns to withdraw eggs for 14 days following the final dose when the most that has been found in an egg is just 0.8 mg ( less than 1/2000th of the dose used for a two-year-old).

Well, those withdrawal guidelines were enacted by the FDA in 1996, and they were pretty arbitrary. The guidelines were meant to ensure that people wouldn't be exposed to the drug at levels higher than a dose "13,000 times lower than the therapeutic dose well tolerated by humans." (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/Products/ApprovedAnimalDrugProducts/FOIADrugSummaries/ucm049524.pdf)

Shenanigans! I have my own conspiracy theories as to why the FDA created those withdrawal recommendations back in 1996, but I won't punish you all with them. I will, however, be eating the eggs that my gals lay after I dose them with Wazine, and I won't be worrying about poisoning myself because even if I gorge on six eggs the very next day, I'll have only ingested 6.4 mg (or 0.1 % of a therapeutic dose of a drug used to treat parasitic infections in humans). If I were pregnant or breast-feeding, I might err on the side of caution, but I feel confident that a 0.1% dose isn't going to hurt me or anyone else in my family.

Awesome! I am going to start following you. I distrust the FDA on general principles, & look forward to your conspiracy theories.
post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddpittman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by wasakat View Post

There are a lot of worming products on the market and many of us tend to balk at using them because they usually have a disclaimer stating not to consume eggs for 14 days after administering the final dose. Well, crums! Who wants to chuck out beautiful eggs for 24 days? (First dose, followed by a final dose 10 days later). I just picked up a bottle of Wazine - a very safe and highly effective anti-wormer - and was basically resigned to tossing out a huge number of eggs. Then, I did a little research, and I thought I would share what I found out.

The active ingredient in Wazine is piperazine. Among other things, piperazine is used to treat intestinal parasitic infections in chickens, pigs, dogs, and HUMANS. Dosage for humans is as follows: 6g taken orally for 1 day followed 10 days later by a second 6g dose for adults. For children 8 to 14 years old, the dosage is reduced to 4 g. For children 2 to 8, the dosage is 2 grams. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/piperazine-oral-route/proper-use/drg-20065522)

When given to laying hens at a dosage of 300mg/kg body weight, piperazine was found in the eggs at a highest concentration of 0.8mg twenty-four hours after the hen was medicated, and then at 0.2mg ninety-six hours after the hen was medicated (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?sid=24898556&viewopt=Deposited.) For folks who don't remember, there are 1000 mg in a single gram, so the smallest dosage used to treat a 2-year-old is 2000 mg. Given this information, I wondered why the product warns to withdraw eggs for 14 days following the final dose when the most that has been found in an egg is just 0.8 mg ( less than 1/2000th of the dose used for a two-year-old).

Well, those withdrawal guidelines were enacted by the FDA in 1996, and they were pretty arbitrary. The guidelines were meant to ensure that people wouldn't be exposed to the drug at levels higher than a dose "13,000 times lower than the therapeutic dose well tolerated by humans." (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/Products/ApprovedAnimalDrugProducts/FOIADrugSummaries/ucm049524.pdf)

Shenanigans! I have my own conspiracy theories as to why the FDA created those withdrawal recommendations back in 1996, but I won't punish you all with them. I will, however, be eating the eggs that my gals lay after I dose them with Wazine, and I won't be worrying about poisoning myself because even if I gorge on six eggs the very next day, I'll have only ingested 6.4 mg (or 0.1 % of a therapeutic dose of a drug used to treat parasitic infections in humans). If I were pregnant or breast-feeding, I might err on the side of caution, but I feel confident that a 0.1% dose isn't going to hurt me or anyone else in my family.

Awesome! I am going to start following you. I distrust the FDA on general principles, & look forward to your conspiracy theories.

Other countries have a zero day egg withdrawal after using Wazine.

-Kathy
post #37 of 37
You made my decision to dose everyone. Thanks!
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