Pigeon bloodline management- A look at the system I use

Today we are going to look at pigeon bloodline management. It is important to know who your birds are related to...
  1. Quacking Pigeon
    Today we are going to look at pigeon bloodline management. It is important to know who your birds are related to and generations. I do what many other lofts don’t, and that is labeling each individual ‘breeder’ bird a letter. For example I have a pair of two unrelated birds, the hen I label a ‘A’ and the cock I label a ‘B’. The offspring from this pair would be ‘AB’. This system can help identify your birds without needing to remember ring numbers to some extent.

    What I do is when I get new birds I label them with a letter alphabetically but if the birds may be related I label them with the same letter. These are some of the newest birds I’m expecting to hatch soon:

    A3B3C, A2B2

    These birds as can be seen are inbred to some extent. The ‘A’ is my mixed pair hen, she is a red king pigeon. ‘B’ is my mixed pair cock, he is a white crossbred. ‘C’ is a hen, she was a white fantail. The numbers ‘power’ after the letter is the amount inbred. For example I breed a:

    AB (F), AB (M) -The birds produced from this pair would be a ‘A2B2’
    AB (M), C (F) -The birds produced from this pair would be a ‘ABC’

    How this works is how many time a individual letter is shown you give it a power, which shows how inbred a bird is. My most inbred bird(s) I have flying around now are ‘A2B2(s)’ which I have 5 of.

    Two of my ‘A2B2’ pigeons when they were squabs:
    60B7D183-1ECC-44F8-9B1E-91610679D8F8.jpeg

    What happens when you run out of letters? Still thinking about that...

    If you are confused or have any questions feel free to leave a comment below.

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