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Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by North Briton, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. North Briton

    North Briton Out Of The Brooder

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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2009
  2. snowydiamonds

    snowydiamonds Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks for sharing this in layman's terms, North Brit:) I'll be utilizing this info in management of my flocks...I've been considering the use of whole oats for a few months now since mine have to stay confined for most of the year and I find when I butcher their body cavities are too fatty from scratch/corn and I didn't think I was over feeding.
     
  3. North Briton

    North Briton Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi, Sd,
    Thank you for the responce. Yes whole soaked oats are very good feed in confinement, high fiber low fat. All seeds have in them an enzyme inhibitor to protien metabolism, the key to unlock this is another enzyme contained in the husk or skin. When the grain is soaked this enzyme is transfered into the seed and with suficient warmth, alows full protien metabolism. I have lots more info on the nutritional benfits of soaking and sprouting which I will post soon.
     
  4. luvmygirlsinAK

    luvmygirlsinAK Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:My chickens absolutely love the sprouted grains that I give them, which of course are high in protein. I'm always amazed at how much they like meat as well. I give them organic: coconut flakes, sunflower seeds, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, spelt, kamut, oats, alfalfa pellets, barley, corn, molasses flakes, kelp, a mineral/ sea salt supplement, parsley flakes, comfrey flakes, and free choice: layer pellets, grit and oyster shell grit. And of course the usual kitchen stuff. I also add raw apple cider vinegar to their filtered water.

    I found your information to be very interesting! Can't wait to hear more!! Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  5. North Briton

    North Briton Out Of The Brooder

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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2009
  6. luvmygirlsinAK

    luvmygirlsinAK Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:That's because we're well fed! [​IMG]

    As I'm sure you're well aware, you are what you eat, remember?! [​IMG]
     
  7. cherig22

    cherig22 Green Fields Farm

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    Chickens require less energy and more protein as the environmental temperature increases, so in summer they want less total feed but higher protein and in winter more feed with lower protein. In cold climates, rations may be as low as twelve percent protein and up to eighteen percent in warm climates. Protein levels of over twenty percent become toxic to chickens.

    I thought that they needed HIGHER protein in the winter. To keep them warm. And less in the summer.

    Cheri [​IMG]
     
  8. luvmygirlsinAK

    luvmygirlsinAK Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I thought that they needed HIGHER protein in the winter. To keep them warm. And less in the summer.

    Cheri [​IMG]

    This is why I give my chickens so many things that are higher in protein. Living in Alaska without very much sunlight in the winter, they need the extra protein. The seeds have protein, Spelt is high in protein, Kamut is high in protein, and sprouted grains are high in protein. The less actual sunlight, the higher the protein needs to be for chickens in winter in order to have high quality eggs. Even though I use supplemental lighting, it just isn't the same. The sun was out for about 3 hours straight yesterday, there is a huge difference in that light compared to the full spectrum bulbs I have in the coop. When the sun was shining through the door window and the big window above, it was soooo cheerful inside the coop. We haven't had much of that for a looooong time!! [​IMG]
     
  9. JustChicky

    JustChicky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are boiled eggs enough extra protein?

    I should feed mine some oats, because I over fed scratch, thank you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2009
  10. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Mixed grain and layers pellets may be enough for average chickens on a free range that can supply them with all the rest of the nutrients they need for health, but it certainly is not enough for birds in confinement.

    Is this confinement considered confined to a permanent run or confined to a cage, like in commercial operations?​
     

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