24 weeks and not a single egg

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by gel2727, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. gel2727

    gel2727 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2009
    CT
    My chickens are 24 weeks now, and I haven't gotten a single egg yet. I have several different breeds, and I know some take longer than others, but I was expecting at least a few to have started by now. They all have nice bright red combs and wattles now, and look as healthy as can be. And they are definitely getting enough to eat. I am going to start putting a light on for them since it gets dark around 5 now. Any ideas for me? I'm trying to be patient, but having to buy both feed and eggs isn't fun (and we are broke!).

    My breeds:
    Australorp
    Favorelle
    Gold laced wyandotte
    Buttercup
    Buff Orpington
    Black Giant
    White Giant
    Partridge Rock
    Speckled Sussex
    Light Brahma
    Blue Cochin
    Dominique
    Columbian Wyandotte
    White Rock or White Orpington (lost one to a predator but can't tell which)
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Be sure they aren't laying in a hidden corner; they may not use the nests when they first start. If the Australorps are nice and red, I'd bet they will be your first. At this time of year, some may not even start til spring. 24 weeks is just too soon to expect many; this varies so much. Some of those are slow maturing breeds; I'd have to look some up, but I know Orps are slow to mature. Sometimes a hen doesn't lay for a year. The light will encourage some to lay more eggs on shorter days among hens who are already laying, but I don't believe it will make a difference in when they start.
     
  3. Nutmeg101

    Nutmeg101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 21, 2013
    Georgia
    I have 5 that are 23-24 weeks. Mine aren't laying either. I figured it would be spring before I get eggs. I have 1 barred rock that is 25-26 weeks and she is the only one laying.
     
  4. PrairieChickens

    PrairieChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kansas
    I don't tend to expect eggs from my birds until they're at least 6 months old, and this time of year, you can expect further setbacks to egg production. A hen lays less when the days are short, so a young pullet about to start laying would be delayed by the winter months. You can supplement their lighting with a light on a timer or just wait it out, but expect to wait.

    For most breeds, a reddening comb and wattle are good indicators that your hens are about to start laying. If your birds still have undeveloped, pink combs and waddles, you probably still have a while to wait.
     
  5. aje127

    aje127 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 22, 2013
    My Australop just started laying this week and I wasn't expecting until
    jan. so now do I need to start feeding her laying mash?
     
  6. PrairieChickens

    PrairieChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That would be recommended. It's the easiest way to make sure she's getting everything she needs.
     
  7. aje127

    aje127 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 22, 2013
    That would be recommended.  It's the easiest way to make sure she's getting everything she needs.
    [/quote
    Do I mix it in with the chick feed? I still have several girls that haven't started laying yet
     
  8. PrairieChickens

    PrairieChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In my experience, it doesn't hurt anything for the younger chickens to eat layer feed. If you're concerned about them getting exactly the right feed, your only real option is to segregate the laying hen so that she is the only one with access to her food, but I would find that to be an unnecessary trouble.
     

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