3 1/2 WEEK OLD CHICKS KNOCK SNOT OUT OF 8 WEEK OLD JUVENILES

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by centrarchid, Aug 31, 2013.

  1. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    As dusk approached I put out some feed on concrete driveway for the front porch flock, The game hen with chicks got there first and began filling up while harem master with the juveniles came in about 2 minutes later (mother of juveniles is incubating another clutch). One on one the juveniles could whip the chicks under normal conditions because the former have nearly a 3 to 1 weight advantage. The problem for the juveniles is the mother of the chicks is dominant over the juveniles' mother. This makes so mother of chicks can peck the other hens chicks but not vice versa. The juveniles will as a group attempt to bluster the chicks but the latters mother typically intervenes. This round the one of the chicks took care of business by itself. While mother drove off the majority of the juveniles in one direction, a chick took on the only male juvenile by pecking, flogging and chasing making so chick's brood mates could eat in peace. It was very interesting to see how aggressive such a little bird could be. The aggressive little bird then joined its brood mates to resume feeding without further discord.
     
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  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Somewhat related is the observation on a mixed brood of American Dominiques. A hen with a single two week old chick took in two 10 week old juveniles that now forages with her and chick without aggression towards small chick. This morning, a couple slightly older and larger juveniles from other side of yard tried to displace chick from pile of eats. The two juveniles that hang with its mother as well attacked the interlopers and ran them off. The chick was thus able to continue feeding. Thee birds are clearly able to recognize each other as individuals and some of what they do with respect to aggression can benefit flock / brood mates.
     
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