3 week old chicks

JadedChickenLove

In the Brooder
May 18, 2017
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I am fairly new to chickens. I have some 7 week Olds that are a mixed flock and recently got some Easter Eggers that are now 3 weeks old. They have been in a separate part of the coop for a week now. They can see and hear the 7 week old flock. Can they go in with the 7 week old chicks now? Thanks.
 

Kiki

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put them together and watch them....make sure they don't harm each other.
I would think they should all learn pretty quickly being that close in age, but you won't know til you try it.
Good luck.

Btw :welcome
 

aart

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put them together and watch them....make sure they don't harm each other.
I would think they should all learn pretty quickly being that close in age, but you won't know til you try it.
Good luck.

Btw :welcome
Ditto Dat^^^

Try putting them all together, if that doesn't go well, try putting 1 or 2 of one group in with the other group...chicken juggling!
Keep mixing and matching until they are as harmonious as possible.



It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).

Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.

Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
 

JadedChickenLove

In the Brooder
May 18, 2017
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5
16
Thanks. I think k this afternoon if it's not raining I will get the 3 week olds into the run with the 7 week olds and sit with them. I know the Rooster, who is named Bach, will show that he is in charge. I just don't want the Littles to get hurt. Maybe leavevthe littles in the run for a bit then put them back in their safe zone.
 

aart

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Thanks. I think k this afternoon if it's not raining I will get the 3 week olds into the run with the 7 week olds and sit with them. I know the Rooster, who is named Bach, will show that he is in charge. I just don't want the Littles to get hurt. Maybe leavevthe littles in the run for a bit then put them back in their safe zone.
At 7 weeks the cockerel may be in charge.... or not.
Way too young for hormones to be playing much of a role...the most assertive/aggressive chick could also be a pullet.

FYI.....semantics, maybe, but can be important communication terms when discussing chicken behavior.
Female chickens are called pullets until one year of age, then they are called hens.
Male chickens are called cockerels until one year of age, then they are called cocks(or cockbirds or roosters).
 

JadedChickenLove

In the Brooder
May 18, 2017
9
5
16
At 7 weeks the cockerel may be in charge.... or not.
Way too young for hormones to be playing much of a role...the most assertive/aggressive chick could also be a pullet.

FYI.....semantics, maybe, but can be important communication terms when discussing chicken behavior.
Female chickens are called pullets until one year of age, then they are called hens.
Male chickens are called cockerels until one year of age, then they are called cocks(or cockbirds or roosters).

Thanks. I get my terms mixed up. Bach, my cocktail is for sure a male! He is my profile photo. He acts like he is in charge. He walks around proud and squalks at the ladies and will ruffle his neck feathers up. He is fun to watch. I have noticed hime the last couple of says sitting up high watching the flock and the sky.
 

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