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8x8 Coop Building Diary!! *pictures* UPDATE on pg 7!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Morgan7782, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. dmiravalle

    dmiravalle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:4?? Ha, that is what I said! Never works. LOL!
     
  2. audioguy

    audioguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 6, 2010
    Branchburg, NJ
    Quote:4?? Ha, that is what I said! Never works. LOL!

    I had to first convince my wife that they are fun to raise and having fresh eggs is the best. Once I had her sold on the idea, she agreed to "start" with 4 layers. One for each of us. Knowing her like I do, she will learn to love them and my bet is she will get so into them that she will take over the chores! Should be interesting!! My two kids (8 & 10) can't wait!
     
  3. MyKidLuvsGreenEgz

    MyKidLuvsGreenEgz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I was wondering about that, too. It all depends on the type of soil, the amount of rain you get, and landscaping in regard to runoff or pooling.
    It looks like the area chosen has been a flower garden in the past? If so, it's been till or turned and is soft-ish? If that's the case those small concrete pads will probably sink in. In my opinion it's the size of the pads on the ground that matters. (If you pour quickrete into a hole that's not much bigger around than the pad on top of it, it's still going to sink in. They need snowshoes! The footprint of each foundation pad must be bigger. If you're moving soon, a fast fix would be a 2x10x20 inch green treated plank under each pad.
    If you were building that here in Minnesota, you'd have to plan for frost heaving, also.

    Other than that, it's a fine example of craftsmanship. Kudos.

    =============

    We have mostly sand for soil. Was thinking about raising our chicken house by using concrete blocks. Will I too need some kind of "snowshoe"? Foundation?
     
  4. farmer_lew

    farmer_lew Hi-Tech Redneck

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    Jun 29, 2010
    In the hills
    We have mostly sand for soil. Was thinking about raising our chicken house by using concrete blocks. Will I too need some kind of "snowshoe"? Foundation?

    Sandy soil does present a problem, alright. You may have to dig down until you get to solid ground. Otherwise you will need a "snowshoe" type footing. If not, your coop will settle in the sand, and of course each pier block will settle at different rates, causing damage to your coop. It could possibly even fall off the blocks.

    You may just want to get pressure treated 4x4's and build your coop on "skids".​
     
  5. OkChickens

    OkChickens Orpingtons Are Us

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    Dec 1, 2010
    Owasso, Oklahoma
    Quote:============

    Would you post pix of the crates? on sides? Tilted? We're thinking of that or low buckets when we redo the coops this Spring. Thanks.

    I cut the whole front of the milk crate except about 2" from the bottom. Mine say Dean Foods along the bottom and is there to keep the straw in and the eggs from rolling out. I have stacked them but they are not sturdy. I would not put them at ground level to keep them from pooping and scratching the bedding out.

    -Nate
     
  6. MyKidLuvsGreenEgz

    MyKidLuvsGreenEgz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2011
    Colorado Plains
    Quote:============

    Would you post pix of the crates? on sides? Tilted? We're thinking of that or low buckets when we redo the coops this Spring. Thanks.

    I cut the whole front of the milk crate except about 2" from the bottom. Mine say Dean Foods along the bottom and is there to keep the straw in and the eggs from rolling out. I have stacked them but they are not sturdy. I would not put them at ground level to keep them from pooping and scratching the bedding out.

    -Nate

    ==============

    Could I start with a pallet, put 2 layers of cinderblocks on that (at each corner of the 4x4 "floor"), then build the house? The pallets we have are in good condition.
     
  7. cabincrazyone

    cabincrazyone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 26, 2010
    NE Minnesota
    Quote:Sandy soil does present a problem, alright. You may have to dig down until you get to solid ground. Otherwise you will need a "snowshoe" type footing. If not, your coop will settle in the sand, and of course each pier block will settle at different rates, causing damage to your coop. It could possibly even fall off the blocks.

    You may just want to get pressure treated 4x4's and build your coop on "skids".

    I hope we're not giving you a headache with this foundation discussion. First, if you're not sure about moving, you might just leave the coop footings as they are. Nothing's going to happen over night. As you keep an eye on it, a few months could turn into a year without significant movement. It could be fine the way it is for years. (Lew's idea of skids is good.)

    I built my cabin in 1970 on sandy soil. It's 20 by 24 feet. I decided to set it on top of the ground just as you're doing because the other alternative (the correct one in our cold climate) is digging down six feet, pouring a pad down there, standing a pillar on that and backfilling ... for each of 12 footings. I would have had to dig by hand and I had no money so I put the cabin on twelve 18x24 inch pads on top of the ground. Through the years it's settled about five inches, some places more than others. When a door sticks I put a shim under this or that footing.

    For a smaller building it's not as crucial. It becomes subjective. I'm a perfectionist, and I'm also a realist. What are you willing to put up with? If it settles enough for a door or a window to stick and you shim a corner to fix it, are you OK with that?

    I have to chuckle when I remember my dad telling about this guy or that guy who raised a family in a house that was in worse shape than most chicken coops. He said that fellow would cut firewood constantly rather than fix the house up a bit. I guess that's the opposite extreme.

    In the end it's all subjective.

    I got a little windy. Maybe I should write a book. :^)
     
  8. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    middle TN
    Right -- digging down to hard-pack can be pretty deep depending on where you are. Around here, we're lucky to dig 12" before we hit a large, flat rock so I'm going to be able to use concrete footings and posts without much digging at all (the supporting boulder is larger than the coop and probably at the surface in 4 of 6 support points).

    I didn't realize you were moving soon so absolutely I'd just jack it up and stick a few chunks of wide board under the footings (love the term snowshoe) if you see a problem developing.
     
  9. Morgan7782

    Morgan7782 Dense Egg Goo

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    Mar 22, 2010
    Sacramento CA
    Day two!

    Wow time has flown by! We hit Home Depot on Tuesday evening and had a good time getting a lot of wood and hardware and paint and stuff. It was cool [​IMG] We found some good plywood, but had to ask the guys to get another pallet down because my new and improved coop guy is rightfully picky!

    So today consisted of getting the walls up. I tried hammering again, and the nails kept bending and I was getting pretty frustated and irritated lol. But I did find something I was good at!!! Putting the lag screws in with a wratchet (I think?). And taking pictures!!!! So today we got walls finished, door cut out, roof on.

    Tomorrow is cutting windows out, putting door up, putting corrogated roofing on, and if time, painting with sealer!

    YAY!

    Pictures

    Wood:
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    Wall Frames going up!
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    My tool area hehe
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    Walls were put up in kit form so it will be easier to take down and move
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    Foreman Joon
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    Walls front view with door cutout
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    Side angle
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    Roof Frame
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    First wall up
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    Roof
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    Back wall up
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    Side wall up
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    Sawing
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    Front view
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    Hammering
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    Front view
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    Walls just about up!
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    Farmer Lew cutting plywood
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    Doorway! We just cut out the door, and put the plywood up with the cut out [​IMG]
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    This rose bush had it OUT for Farmer Lew!!!
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    Roof on with vents! They will be covered with hardware cloth [​IMG] one on either side.
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    Inside
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    Front
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    Hammering roof plywood on!
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    YAY! PROGRESS! This was all done in one day [​IMG] Tomorrow we add roofing, cut windows, add door and paint! Or whatever we have time for [​IMG]
     
  10. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

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    I am SO excited for you! That's gonna be a great, walk in coop! I want one!
     

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