A Heritage of Perfection: Standard-bred Large Fowl

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by Yellow House Farm, May 3, 2014.

  1. BGMatt

    BGMatt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I actually didn't recognize the screen name, or even look at it. Was just giving advice and assumed it was a standard breed because of what thread the question was in.

    Isbars don't have a standard here or anywhere else in the world. That is likely why you can't find an answer. Split breast doesn't affect egg production, and since there's no standard, breed for any cosmetic issues you like. Already told you that though.
     
  2. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    OK, so I just saw your pics below. Though I have no experience breeding those, per se; my gut reaction is that I would imagine that split breast would be a serious fault. If it is a recessive trait, as Karen suggested, than you definitely want to cull it, because if it takes hold you'll have a bear of a time removing it. On the other hand, insofar as they're not standard-bred fowl and have very little chance of being recognized, I wouldn't think it would actually matter because I can't imagine split breast impacting egg production. It will, however, damage the gene pool for future improvements.

    Good luck with those.
     
  3. Apparently many breed standards don't mention split breast at all, as fault or otherwise, from what I am reading of the "other" forum being referenced here.
     
  4. Kinmera

    Kinmera Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Posting to follow the discussion
     
  5. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    I say that it is because the opposite is addressed. It is part of what implied in the breast description that reads "well rounded". A "well rounded" breast would not be split and would not be cut off in sharp descent to shank.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    How do you "fix" a cut-off breast?
    Thanks,
    Karen
     
  7. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, I'm not sure if it is recessive, I've not researched it. If you've discovered that it is recessive, and it is expressing itself that means that the gene is strong in the gene pool. As Matt clearly stated, one would cull it, and cull every bird that expresses it, because if it is recessive and expressing that means that it homogenous for it, which means it will give the gene to all progeny.
     
  8. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    I would like to see a picture of the "spit breast".

    Karen, what do you mean by "cut off" breast?
     
  9. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    George, I was referring to the breast line that almost cuts from lower next to shank without first filling out in a well rounded full breast, in short a shallow, undeveloped breast.
     
  10. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    "breast...would not be cut off in sharp descent to shank."
     

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