ACV, garlic and other 'supplements'?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by DreamsInPink, May 3, 2016.

  1. DreamsInPink

    DreamsInPink Chillin' With My Peeps


    I have to agree with you on this. After doing some reading, I won't be giving garlic to my chickens. ( and it's funny, the chicken chick has two different articles.. one advocating garlic and one saying it should only be given in small quantities, occasionally.) :rolleyes:

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2014/05/raising-chickens-naturally-garlic-with.html

    http://www.communitychickens.com/top-5-myths-and-facts-about-treats-for-chickens/


    The jury is still out on ACV. Anyone have any input on that?
     
  2. mimsy

    mimsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't read anything that makes me feel that it will help a ton of health issues. However, it definately keeps a lot of bacteria from growing in their water, especially during the summer. I also can't find anything that suggests it will hurt anyone. So I add a little to the water, especially during warmer months. I leave my shallow dishes just water since I clean those out several times a day, but that giant bucket/nipple one gets vinegar.

    Vinegar does kill a lot of bacteria safely around animals. Studies have shown if you spray vinegar on an object and then spray hydrogen peroxide/water solution on it it kills more bacteria than bleach. This combo can even be used on seeds before sprouting or chopping boards without having to worry if there is some residue left.

    So, though not going to say with any real certainty that it has any real miracle benefit with their health, I don't hesitate using it and if it does do any of the good that it's touted for, well great.
     
  3. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Vinegar too.This is also a de worming method.
     
  5. DreamsInPink

    DreamsInPink Chillin' With My Peeps


    I've also heard about the ACV preventing algae in waterers.. which would be great. Do you know if it has to be the raw organic brand, like Bragg.. or can it be any kind?





    But what is considered a safe amount? No amounts are given, so it's kind of all relative. :(
     
  6. mimsy

    mimsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any kind works for the algae. Sometimes I use a raw organic brand if I stop by the co-op, the rest of the time just any old store bought apple cider vinegar. Distilled would work for algae as well. I use apple cider just in case they get some minerals and such out of it, as a double bonus.

    Interestingly enough they seem to like the taste of vinegar. I use a heavy amount of balsamic vinegar in my salads and they LOVE that. I have a pet starling that loves to dip his beak in any vinegar and rub it all over under his wings as well. I know it's called anting, but no one knows for certain why starlings and other birds do it...perhaps parasite prevention of some sort.
     
  7. DreamsInPink

    DreamsInPink Chillin' With My Peeps


    I don't have any of the organic stuff, so I'm happy to learn any will do for the algae prevention. xD I will also use the apple cider vinegar instead of distilled. That's funny that they actually like it. I am going to be doing a 55 gallon drum for water in the run and probably 2 or 3 5 gallon buckets as well.. all with horizontal nipples. The 55 gallon drum will most likely be blue... does that inhibit algae growth as well? Is it the actual sunlight hitting the water that causes algae or is it the heat??

    Anting huh? I've never heard of it. Why do you have a starling? :)
     
  8. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's mostly the light for algae growth.

    If you want to find out the scientific studies relating to various supplements, do your searches on Pubmed or at very least Google Scholar. I've done a lot of looking into things since I started with my chicks.

    Garlic does have nice antimicrobial action--adding it to your water will help prevent growth there. It may prevent/treat sour crop by killing the candida yeast that tends to overgrow in those cases. Not much antimicrobial effects past the crop though unless you overdo it--then you start killing the good gut bacteria and you don't want that. If you feed crushed garlic(as opposed to just adding it to their water) however, it acts as a prebiotic in the intestinal tract. To summarize, it's nice to supplement their diet by feeding crushed garlic every once in a while. It has to be freshly crushed...the dried stuff doesn't work as the compounds start breaking down upon exposure to oxygen. The primary active compound is allicin.

    For ACV, I would use it to prevent algae growth, but haven't been convinced otherwise. My birds get a better probiotic through their fermented feed.

    One thing that I do recommend is feeding minced hot peppers. There was a nice study that looked at the effects of capsaicin, cinnealdehyde (from cinnamon) and carvacrol (oregano) on the gut...all of the compounds were found to stimulate the immune system of the gut, but capsaicin was a lot better at it. Given all the things that go into a chicken's mouth, I'm all for immune support in that body system. My chickens get jalapenos, habeneros, thai bird chilis, etc. about once monthly. When my plants start producing, they may get it more often as I have several pepper plants in my "chicken food" garden.
     
  9. mimsy

    mimsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also add cayenne, oregano and sometimes cinnamon to their food. (I also add it to our parrots foods) Mostly because it also keeps out ants and rodents, but again, anything good it does for the chickens I think is an awesome benefit. A lot of birds go out of their way to eat hot peppers. We eat a lot of them ourselves and like to share with the birds.

    The study you saw, does it happen to be online where you could share a link? There is a lot of interesting information on herbs, spices and such for animals but so few good studies done.
     
  10. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The abstract is at least: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21645315
     
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