Adding a new baby in with 4 others

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Thepriceofbeauty, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. Thepriceofbeauty

    Thepriceofbeauty In the Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2018
    Thornton, CO
    Hey guys, I recently became a new chicken mom to 2 black Australorps (12 days old), 1 Sapphire Gem (9 days old) , and and Americana (9 days old).

    One of my good friends is trying to live vicariously through me, and would like to gift me a silkie tomorrow :jumpy

    Is it possible to add to my flock at this point, and put her in the brooder with the rest? I need to aquire more information as to where she is getting this baby chick from. Do I need to worry about disease if it's not from a breeder? My girls are already getting a bit crazy, and I know there is a limited amount of time to add baby chicks to the flock, but would definitely like to bring this girl home if possible.
     
  2. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    "I know there is a limited amount of time to add baby chicks to the flock, but would definitely like to bring this girl home if possible."

    How old is this chick and are you aware that there is a 50%+ chance of it being a male..... silkies are notoriously difficult to sex at the usual pre adolescent ages but at hatch is significantly more difficult than standard size breeds. Your average breeder has no way of knowing the sex of a chick like that. Are you able to keep roosters in your area if it turns out to be a little boy? Just another thing to consider before complicating your brooder situation.
    Also because silkies are "different" looking, they can sometimes get picked on and are usually better kept with other silkies, so getting 2 or 3 is better, especially as they are not so good at roosting, so better for them to have a snuggle partner at night.
    Another consideration is how much space you have in your coop.... if you have already bought or made one.... many of the prefabricated coops are advertised as housing significantly more birds that can be healthily accommodated, so whilst these tiny chicks look like they would easily live in such a space in harmony and the manufacturer may sell them to hold a set number, when the birds grow up and reach adolescence, and hormones start flowing, pullets can be as tetchy as teenage girls and suddenly the coop is no longer big enough.

    Just a few things to take into consideration before you add another little one to your flock.

    Best wishes

    Barbara
     
  3. Thepriceofbeauty

    Thepriceofbeauty In the Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2018
    Thornton, CO
    Ahh yes I don't consider the sexing issue! Looks like I will have to let her down gently. I definitely don't want a lonely little silkie if it won't thrive, and roos are definitely not allowed. Thank you so much!
     
  4. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    Birds of a feather flock together..Possibly will pick on the Silkie. Don't get it..:frow
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Free Ranging

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    As long as there has been adequate brooder space, I've never had a problem adding chicks in that age range as long as the new one was adequately mobile (3 days plus).
    The real caveat is space.
    Definitely get information about the source of the new birds. Specifically, has it been exposed to adult birds or someone that has handled adult birds. Disease is the thought pattern here.
    Have you really thought out having a silkie with those other breeds? Do you plan on free ranging? Silkies are vulnerable in a number of ways.
     

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