Adding to flock during DFP outbreak?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Island Juli, Aug 6, 2016.

  1. Island Juli

    Island Juli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've got a flock of a little over 100. I sell eggs and was selling chicks and roosters until last couple of weeks. I've got a run of dry fowl pox going. Not sure where it came from, nothing new in the flock in months except my own hatches.

    Neighbors do have chickens, but I've not seen one of his in months. I am in Hawaii so mosquitoes are out in abundance year round.

    My question is this, I have the opportunity to buy a healthy flock of 40+/- of a friend moving back to the mainland for an insanely small amount, is it okay to bring more on to the property while the pox is still running through my flock? It's been 2 weeks and no one seems worse the ware other than looking unsightly. All eating, drinking and acting their normal crazy selves. In fact, egg production has gone up the last few days.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I've had dry pox here and there, but only in my turkeys, so far not in my chickens. They range in the same area, and aren't kept that far apart, so I'm not sure why. They do say it's spread by mosquitos, or on the wind. I would probably go and get the new birds and just expect they might get it. As you said it's mostly affect their looks. I have found it to be a hit and miss disease that runs it's course without any intervention.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Since you have an outbreak, I would recommend either waiting, or getting the new chickens vaccinated for pox before they come onto your property. It is spread by mosquitoes and flies. Most will be immune to that particular fowl pox strain after an outbreak, but new birds should be vaccinated in areas where pox is very common in tropical areas.
     
  4. Island Juli

    Island Juli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't wait. Couldn't wait. Went to check them out and had to rescue them. She had a gorgeous blue orpington rooster and 6 orp hens in a cage maybe 6 x 6. They are 2 years old and had never been out of the cage!!! The other 30+ were in a cage about 8 x 12 abd were never let out. I kid you not, the poo was wet and ankle deep in there!!

    Many looked malnourished and terribly thin. Several have no back feathers at all and when checking them over as we unloaded, several have no feathers from under their necks all the way to the vent. Red and raw, not surprised as I didn't see a lot of clean places to roost.

    They ate and drank like no tomorrow and I'm let them rest and adjust tonight and will spend tomorrow cataloguing/marking them and addressing their injuries.

    They are quarantined, but don't look sick just neglected.

    As for my flock's pox, no new cases today and most are scabbing over. The original juvie we found with it is going to be terribly scarred, poor thing. My daughter says she needs some plastic surgery, but we love her nonetheless (both the daughter and the chicken!)
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Good luck with your chickens, and it is good to know that you rescued them to have a much better life from now on. I live in the humid Ohio Valley, but we are fortunate not to have much pox. I have only seen perhaps one or two scabs on one or two chickens per summer. Some tropical or southern states such as Louisiana, Florida, and Texas have terrible cases of pox. You should use some antibiotic ointment or Vetericyn in the eyes of chickens with scabs near eyes, since they can lead to blindness from secondary bacterial infections.
     
  7. Island Juli

    Island Juli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No worries, they are quarantined on a different part of the property. These poor things don't know what do to with space. They just plop down wherever I set them. They did get up when I brought out food, and again they ate like they would never eat again.

    Was surprised to find a couple of eggs from them, was not expecting any for weeks.

    Lots of TLC over the next few weeks and hopefully they will all make it.

    In the mix I also got 3 roosters, the lavender Orpington, a Welsummers, and one I have no clue. I'll get a picture when they look better.

    Question about the Orps, the hens are Buffs, with the lavender rooster will I get any lavendar chicks? (I tried to decipher some things I found, just not my thing I guess).

    Thanks!!
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Good that you have the space to separate them, hopefully far enough away...will be better for both flocks.
    The eggs you got the first day at your place were already in process at their old place, so you might not see any more for awhile.....
    ....or the influx of good food may have them cranking out eggs without missing a beat.
    Best of cLuck!
     

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