Adjusting the humidity level question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by juliaaa, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. juliaaa

    juliaaa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 15, 2011
    Syracuse, New York
    I finally got a hydrometer in the incubator. I let it set in there for a few hours before checking the reading on it. It says it is at 30%. I added 2 wet paper towels and the spots in the bottom are still filled with water. What am I doing wrong? I can't get it above 30%. I thought I was supposed to have it 40-50% and there is no way I can achieve that. I'm at a loss on what to do as I thought the paper towels would help. I have 39 eggs in the bator, 33 of which we bought. I don't want to mess it up and waste all that money. Is it too late? What can I do?


    Thank you for any advice you can give me :)
     
  2. CupOJoe42

    CupOJoe42 CT Chicken Whisperer

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    Apr 11, 2011
    There are different schools of thought when it comes to incubating. Depending on your incubator type, some people believe in a dry hatch. There is an excellent "sticky" under this forum explaining this method in detail. Other people believe in a low to moderate humidity for the first 18 days and then increasing the humidity for lockdown. Again, how much to increase the humidity is dependent on what type of incubator you are using and what school of thought you are following.

    To increase humidity, you can add more water to the reservoirs (I slip a tube through the vent hole of the hovabator and pour a SMALL amount of water down into the water tray WITHOUT getting the eggs wet.) Do not use cold water. You can also put a wet sponge in the incubator. The idea of increasing humidity is to increase the surface area of the water.

    To decrease humidity, you can remove some water, remove sponge, cover water with foil, or what I do is take a small plastic container with uncooked rice in it and place it in the incubator. The rice absorbs the extra moisture and you don't have to disturb the eggs. You can also make sure both vent holes are open.

    Note that whatever changes you make, do them in small increments, because they could make a BIG difference in the temperature and humidity levels.

    Ok, now if you tell us what kind of incubator you are using and maybe what kind of eggs you are using and what day you set them, we can help you further.
     
  3. juliaaa

    juliaaa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 15, 2011
    Syracuse, New York
    I set the eggs Thursday the 15th.
    I have 24 Rhode Island Red eggs and 15 Silkie assorted color eggs.
    I have an Little Giant still air WITHOUT egg turners. I believe it is a 9200

    I have a reptile humidity meter in there... Maybe that is different than a hydrometer? The lady said it would work so I bought it.

    Maybe I just won't worry too much about the humidity levels. I got the temperature down perfect and have the egg rotating schedule down pat.

    I probably should have asked all of these questions BEFORE I started the incubator. I guess it is all a learning process and you don't know the questions to ask until you get to the point of not knowing :)
     

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