Aggresive quail again, after isolation... Help

KranK

Songster
Jul 13, 2020
583
328
156
Poland
Hello i have 3 female quails without rooster. One was aggresive and i isolated her but after a couple of months one of the 2 that were left together started bullying another quail so i isolated her too. For a week all of them were isolated and after that i put them back together. The one that was left in main cage was pecking the bullies for 2 days, then the one that i isolated lastly became bully again. But now i see that the first bully became the bad guy in the cage. She's pecking 2 others and especially the biggest quail (her feathers even look protruding and not even.). There was no blood but it can't be like that.
What do i do?
If i isolate the bully, one of the two that remain in main cage will bully another one. Should i keep each alone?

PS. it's autumn and soon it's going to be winter and when there are 3 in the cage, they probably make temperature inside higher (+ i cover part of the wire net for the night and i've been putting straw on the dirty straw for 3 weeks (i think thats deep littering?)).
 

Nabiki

Quail Geek
Premium Feather Member
May 15, 2019
9,241
59,448
1,046
Sonoma County, CA
How much space do they have? Do they have enough places to hide from each other? This is the kind of behaviour I would expect from birds that don't have enough space.
 

KranK

Songster
Jul 13, 2020
583
328
156
Poland
I don't know dimensions now but i had a post like this and posted photo of the hutch and you said that it's enough for them. They don't have any places to hide.
1635009512974.png
 

CovidtimeQuail

Songster
Premium Feather Member
Nov 28, 2020
715
1,522
231
Honolulu, HI
Hiding spaces are important, but sometimes one bird has just made up its mind: it doesn't like the others. If you know any other people who raise quail, start an exchange club. You could also try removing them all then adding a couple more to change up the dynamics. Otherwise, start looking up recipes.

Sometimes I think it's like raising teenagers. This school isn't good for them not because of the setting, but because they don't like the other kids. Another school might be good for them because they have friends. That's why after a few months of doing this I ended up resigned to having multiple pens. I'm capping it at three though: it's a hobby, not a career.
 

Nabiki

Quail Geek
Premium Feather Member
May 15, 2019
9,241
59,448
1,046
Sonoma County, CA
From the picture, it looks like about 1.5 meter by about .5 meter? That should be okay for three birds. I would add some hiding places for them.
 

KranK

Songster
Jul 13, 2020
583
328
156
Poland
From the picture, it looks like about 1.5 meter by about .5 meter? That should be okay for three birds. I would add some hiding places for them.
Dimensions are something like that. What could i usea s hiding places? I was thinking about making a little house out of wood. What else could i use?
 

KranK

Songster
Jul 13, 2020
583
328
156
Poland
Hiding spaces are important, but sometimes one bird has just made up its mind: it doesn't like the others. If you know any other people who raise quail, start an exchange club. You could also try removing them all then adding a couple more to change up the dynamics. Otherwise, start looking up recipes.

Sometimes I think it's like raising teenagers. This school isn't good for them not because of the setting, but because they don't like the other kids. Another school might be good for them because they have friends. That's why after a few months of doing this I ended up resigned to having multiple pens. I'm capping it at three though: it's a hobby, not a career.
no one near me has quails unfortunatelly
 

Nabiki

Quail Geek
Premium Feather Member
May 15, 2019
9,241
59,448
1,046
Sonoma County, CA
You can use almost anything as hiding places. Boxes, wood, branches, plastic tubs, flower pots turned on their sides. You can see how some of my birds are set up here. I have a few more in here than I like for the space, but they're all quite calm, so they get along.

PXL_20211023_164101181.jpg
 

Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
2,604
5,878
471
David, Chiriquí, Panama
Small cardboard boxes, empty margarine tubs, PVC 'joints' of sufficient size to allow birds to get in AND turn around inside, empty coffee cans with both ends removed to make a large tunnel, etc., can all be modified and used as cheap, suitable hidey-holes. If attractiveness is an issue, you can paint the objects with 'tempura' paint (non-toxic, even if eaten). Dollar-stores often have plastic shoeboxes that can be filled with cheap, construction grade sand (not chemically cleaned or dyed) to offer them a dustbathing area without sacrificing too much floor space. Bathing for birds is often a group activity, so it could offer your girls some bonding time.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom