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Aggressive Mother hen

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by bannerdb, Oct 20, 2012.

  1. bannerdb

    bannerdb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Donegal, Ireland
    My white rock hatched 3 chicks 5 days ago. I moved her inside with the chicks as it is starting to get cold here at night. I have her in a heated box with the chicks with access to food and water. Howevever, since yesterday, the hen will not allow me to replace the water in the chicks dish or to fI'll their feeder. Every time I approach the box she jumps up and pecks at me. I am worried that the Babies will become dehydrated if they cant access water. They are too small to climb out of the box to feed with their mother. I am considering seperating her from three chicks and raising them by hand. Can anyone advise?
     
  2. Marty1876

    Marty1876 Hi Everyone!

    She needs more space. You've forced her, under small confinement, to believe that anything withen her reach is a threat. I'd give her more space, and let her raise the chicks. You don't want to ruin a good broody. She'll keep them warm, if she has access to a place out of the wind, and covered. It won't be long until they are feathered out.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  3. bannerdb

    bannerdb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Donegal, Ireland
    Could in place some nesting straw on the floor of the garage? Would that be sufficient? How will I get her out?
     
  4. bannerdb

    bannerdb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Donegal, Ireland
    Bump :)
     
  5. polskituft

    polskituft Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2012
    put on some gloves and pick her up
     
  6. Marty1876

    Marty1876 Hi Everyone!

    Yes, that should be fine. Or a small fenced yard and a dog house would also be fine. Gloves will help, if your worried about her pecking you. It doesnt hurt too much, really, just grab quick and confidentaly, pick her striaght up, and put her under your arm. Then, put the babies into a tall but small box or container, and carry everyone to the new home. Put down babies first, then mama, and leave at once and give them space alone. Keep feeders and waterers near the door. She will take her brood to the other side while you attend them. If not, grab your stuff, and fill up outside the door, and then return.
     
  7. LaynaDon95

    LaynaDon95 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 18, 2012
    Texas
    [​IMG] I'm sorry. I'm not laughing at you at all. It just reminded me of when my duck had her babies. I had to isolate her because the rest of the flock came down with fowl pox and I didn't want the babies catching it. I put her in my dog yard in a chicken tractor. (My dog doesn't mess with my flock. She is very good with them. The only thing I have to worry about is her stealing eggs. [​IMG]) and when the babies got a little bigger I opened the tractor to let Mama lead them around the yard. She apparently thought they were still too small, because she waited about a week to take them out, even thought the tractor was open all day. The first day she took them out, the smallest baby got left behind and was peeping and peeping and PEEPING and just couldn't find her way out of the tractor. Mama was getting stressed, trying to show her how to get out, and I was afraid the baby was in danger if she couldn't be with her mommy, so I put on my big girl pants and reached in to grab the baby. Mistake #1. Mama duck swooped out of nowhere and went all ninja on me. I kinda...dropped the duckling...and ran... Okay, so I'm not very brave. Don't judge me. [​IMG] The duckling was fine, but I had a big bruise and a small cut on my leg. I didn't pick the ducklings up anymore. And from then on, every time I came anywhere near the ducklings (like within about 100 miles) Mama was watching me. Waiting for her next chance. I swear. I couldn't fill the waterer without fear for my life. (totally kidding, but she did put on quite a scary show of puffing up and hissing (she's a muscovy) when I got near her babies. She was unimpressed with my heroic attempts to save her abandoned child.)


    [​IMG]

    This is her with her babies. Oh, did I mention she even adopted a little lonely Wyandotte chick I hatched. :)
     

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