All chickens stopped laying eggs

gjalvarado

Hatching
Oct 22, 2020
5
1
5
I have six chickens all of which simply stopped laying eggs 😕. This occurred all throughout the summer and not just now during 2020 fall. I feed them egg laying formula, tried changing foods, amending food with oyster shells, making sure their water is fresh, keeping a clean coop, letting them roam in the yard, etc. They're only two years old and even the new one we got over the spring stopped laying. Any suggestions?
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
Apr 9, 2016
13,775
18,463
782
California's Redwood Coast
Any suggestions?
Most chickens stop laying around that age.. in order to molt and grow in new feathers. Many won't return to lay until daylight increases again.

Have you looked for any hidden nests?

I plan for new pullets to keep me in eggs every year.. This year ALL of my new pullets (Bielefelder) decided to molt instead.. leaving me with no eggs for NO reason.. I even went on lock up to ensure no hidden nest.

My nutrition is spot on.. using 20% protein flock raiser with oyster shell on the side and NOT diminished by excess treats.

Thing is natural bodies do whatever they do regardless of what we plan for or what the norm is.. unfortunately. I could have dealt with one or two of my spring Bielefelder molting.. but all 4.. was a deal breaker for me and I frustratedly sold them. They did lay a short while.. starting super late and not even going into fall. :he

Since you don't have any active layers.. I would consider switching to a flock raiser, grower, or starter.. they usually have more protein AND amino acids (less calcium).. and my birds have less harsh molts returning to lay sooner.. since making the switch.. I NEVER use "layer" any more.. but instead off the OS free choice on the side.. Birds not in lay don't need the added calcium of layer.. as it gets processed through the kidneys and excreted.. long term excess calcium could cause kidney issues including one type of gout and even failure or sudden death.. thought that is MOST likely in birds that are genetically predisposed somehow. Please don't let this statement fear monger you into anything! Lots of folks use only layer forever and still have long bird life. i'm just sharing information! :)

ETA: I just remembered the other possibilities of egg eaters.. look at beaks and head feathers to make sure no one is starting bad habits.

Thieves.. rats, snakes, raccoon, opossum, and even crows have been known to go inside and steal eggs.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,165
107,062
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
I have six chickens all of which simply stopped laying eggs 😕. This occurred all throughout the summer and not just now during 2020 fall. I feed them egg laying formula, tried changing foods, amending food with oyster shells, making sure their water is fresh, keeping a clean coop, letting them roam in the yard, etc. They're only two years old and even the new one we got over the spring stopped laying. Any suggestions?
Starting when, exactly?
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,165
107,062
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
Well, it started with a couple of them last winter, which I know is common, but they continued to not lay through the next summer and then our most reliable layer stopped later this past summer.
Do yo have any idea how old they are?

letting them roam in the yard
Do they free range full time?
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
88,165
107,062
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
In the summer probably 80% of the time and winter months 50% of the time.
Might want to examine birds for laying status:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/who-is-laying-and-who-is-not-butt-check.73309/

Then....
Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers. Leaving them locked in the coop/run for a week or so can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests. Fake eggs/golf balls in the nests can help 'show' them were to lay. They can be confined to coop and maybe run 24/7 for a few days to a week, provided you have adequate space and ventilation, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon. You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom