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Am I the only one who thinks my friend is crazy for this? *dog based*

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ChickenfootDuckbutt, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. ChickenfootDuckbutt

    ChickenfootDuckbutt Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'll try to make this as short an explaination as possible, lol

    Bascally, it's been about 2 1/2 weeks since this happened, so I never really bothered to ask about it, anyways.

    Basically back at the beginning of the month/late last month a friend of mine's Fiance went out one morning to let thier cornish x chickens out of their shed to free-range (they raise meat birds and have a few horses),anyway from what I understand, she was greeted by a rather large, rather AGGRESSIVE dog which charged her, then went on pacing rather frantically back and forth on the far side of the inside of the run (luckily the chickens were locke tight or it probably would have been a slaughter).

    anyway they called the shelter in their town and asked them to come pick it up, well the shelter flat out told them that they could NOT come pick it up due to being over-run with dogs already, and actually ASKED them if they could HOLD ON to the dog for a few "days" until they had room.

    My friend tried to explain that the dog wasn't approachable, but apparently the shelter didn't listen, so I guess after several hours they were able to wear the dog out enough to slip a rope around it's neck and get it out of the chicken pen and tied to a tree in their back field.

    SO I'll fast forward, they still HAVE the dog, as I said 2 1/2 weeks later, they have been feeding it (it won't TOUCH dry dog food OR canned so they have been feeding it processed chicken aready in their freezer), and giving it water (all of which they'd had to do by pushing the bowls with a long stick, because you still cannot get near the dog).

    he's afraid of sticks, he will cower and them lunge and bite the stick apparently, and he has a wound above his left hip, they're not sure if it's a bullet wound or a bite from fighting.

    they also said he managed to grab, kill and them eat a small racoon the other day (he rope he is tied to is like 20 feet they said).

    SO long story short, from what I have heard, the dog has developed an interest in the kids (9 y.o boy and 12 y.o girl), doesn't growl, doesn't show teeth, and even initiated play with the boy by rolling a basketball towards him with his nose.

    but the adults, as soon as he sees them, even my friends fiance, he puts as much distance at his can between him and them, but because he doesn't act skiddish around the kids (they even named him >.>) my brilliant friend has decided to try him out and tame him(they have been looking for a dog anyway), at which I told him he was stupid, but the shelter never called back, and the only other shelter near them charges a "drop-off fee" of 80$ even for strays, and which they said with aggressive dogs they don't even bother walking them into the building, the Euth. them right there in the parkinglot.

    I have not seen the dog because I have not had the time to drive 4 hours lol, but from what I've heard he's either a bluetick colored dog or a black merle, they said he's got the roan/blueish ticked base furs, a black patch on his head which covers his left ear, a large black patch on his back, a black patch on his belly, and white socks on all four feet, and a white patch on his crotch, his ears stand straight up. and on a good day they said he probably should wiegh aroun 90-100 lbs. he is still intact.

    which he probably weighs about 70 now with them feeding him. they don't know if he was an abused drop-off or a left-over from the feral pack that ran around up in their area several years ago but have since as far as anyone knows, been wiped out.

    I honestly do not think they should try to keep him, because from what i understand even with the change with the kids, the dog has gotten no friendlier, I wouldn't keep him, but my friend says theres "something about him I just can't figure out" and "it's like he WANTS to try but doesn't know how"

    I asked him how he would feel if this dog who "wanted to try" took off back into the woods or attacked one of them whe he was finally un-tied, and ofcourse he couldn't answer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  2. Criskin

    Criskin Lost somewhere in a book

    I'm with you. I'm a dog lover but there are so many good dogs being given away or languishing in shelters that I wouldn't start out with one that has proven viscious, especially when children are involved. It is sad because I'm sure something terrible was done to this dog to make it behave in this manner but the risk just isn't worth someone getting hurt or, even worse, killed.
     
  3. Kaitie09

    Kaitie09 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It definitely sounds like it a fear based issue. I'm not going to comment a lot on what I think they should do since I am one of those people that took in a fear aggressive dog. In my case she loved children, and they helped her love adults. She is a great dog now after 8 years, but will still growl at men in hats, and is terrified of brooms, bags, and thunderstorms. However, we trust her completely with children and babies. She has never bitten anyone, and cowers instead of lunging.

    I think they may want to get a trainer in to evaluate whether or not he can be tamed if they really want to keep him.
     
  4. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am not generally in support of rescue groups taking dogs like this and spending valuable time and resources on it and then rehoming the dog when there are so many nice dogs needing their help. But, if this individual wants to try and plans to keep the dog, or euth it if it doesn't work, then I say go for it. He needs to undersyand this could be a very long process, it could be a liability, even years down the road if the dog is okay with them but not strangers. He needs to be prepared to be VERY responsible with the dog, making sure it doesn't get loose, etc. He needs to be prepared to be realistic if the dog is not going to be safe for the family.
     
  5. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    I would be worried about the children, since the dog seems a bit unpredictable.

    A trainer would be a good idea, but personally, I would think it more humane to put the dog down rather than chance someone getting hurt.
     
  6. llrumsey

    llrumsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would be terrified to have my kids around a dog like that, so he is friendly to them the next thing you know, they get to close to his food bowl and bam, they get bit in the face.

    I had this happen in my family, not one of my dogs, they had, had the dog from the time it was a puppy, but the vet told them that when the dog has a bone to take the bone away several times to teach it that they are the master. (very, very stupid is my idea), so this young girl is just walking by the dog, the dog lunges at her face and 10 years later she is still having surgery.

    No get rid of the dog, as much as I love animals, this one just sounds like it is trouble, but that is just my idea.

    I'm the type of person that can't see putting an animal down unless there is no other choice but after reading the article it scared me.
     
  7. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, I think your friend is probably the only one who doesn't realize what a bad plan this is. From the description, this dog has severe behavioral issues and while I'm not going to say that a very dedicated owner couldn't work through those issues, that owner needs to be one without children depending on them to keep them safe. That owner also needs to be prepared to spend a lot of time with behaviorists (not trainers, behaviorists) and micromanage every single aspect of the dog's life. If the dog is fearful enough that they can't even put food or water down without him lunging at them they have no business keeping him on the property with children. This is how maulings happen. Frankly, I would consider calling child protective services if they are really stupid enough to keep such an obviously unsafe animal around kids (and I do not suggest this lightly). Has your friend thought about how they are going to deal with vet visits? I guarantee that dog isn't going to like seeing the vet, and either going to the vet or having one out for a house call (if they can even find one in their area that does house calls) is going to destroy any trust they are able to build up. Vet visits will be extremely traumatic for everyone; the dog, the vet and their employees, and the owner. I understand that the dog's behavior is most likely the result of a painful past for which he is not responsible (although extreme fear aggression like this could also happen if a puppy is simply never exposed to humans), but the level of fear aggression you just described is dangerous and severely decreases the dog's quality of life. It's not fair to the people involved to be in such danger at their own home, and it's not fair to the dog to be living in such a constant state of fear.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  8. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:While I agree with much of what you say, the fact that he is not aggressive with the kids interests me. Makes me think that he was probably abused by adults but not kids, and he sees them as safe. The kids may be in much less danger than anyone thinks. Also, the kids may be doing something different that if noticed, can help the dog adjust. Id definately bring in a real bahvaiorist on this, and id also recommend a video of the dog interacting with the kids as he has, since the behaviorist is an adult and will prob only see his nasty.side.
     
  9. mattfulleroc

    mattfulleroc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It certainly sounds like your friends are taking things into consideration. I find this interesting and do not think they are crazy...they simply do not possess the notion every dog is a rabid feril hound which should be destroyed. I agree with the extremely insightful and thoughtful comments..it is not a task which will be easy...most stray dogs or rescues come with baggage...However, I have seem amazing cases where the animal was given a chance and in time both the dog and its family were better for the experience.
     
  10. BorderKelpie

    BorderKelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 1, 2009
    outside Dallas
    I have a nerve bag dog. I understand the liability issues with him. He is never allowed around outsiders, which includes some close family members. I actually only trust him with myself and my youngest DD. He has a kennel for potty time, a fenced backyard for exercise - never without me there, and is crated in the house when I am not around. I am trying to make sure all bases are covered as far as safety, not just of people, but for his safety and peace of mind as well.

    A dog with fear aggression issues should not be tied up outside where anyone can access him.
    He needs to be carefully confined and supervised. He can not be trusted with 'his' kids' friends, etc. The liability issues are huge. The guilt of that dog actually injuring someone would be immense (at least it would be for me).

    I do hope your friends will consider all aspects of keeping an unstable animal as a pet, and please, remind them of the sweet, happy, emotionally stable dogs that are euthanised every single day for lack of homes.

    No, I don't like killing animals, but the human family's safety and financial security needs to come first. If they make a considerable effort to keep that dog properly managed, good for them. If not - what a devastating ordeal it could turn out to be.
     

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