Amending sandy soil

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by Chic Rustler, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. Chic Rustler

    Chic Rustler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello all. Im a chicken newb, rabbit newb and garden newb and im knee deep in all of it this year for the first time.

    What i have is a 40x40 garden plot that is very sandy. I have been letting my chickens run on it for a couple months and have also dumped a couple wheel barrow loads of rabbit manure on it. I also dumped 3 wheel barrow loads of horse manure on it (some wood shaving mixed in there too) and then tilled it all in last week. I know its late in Texas but im hoping to plant some seeds tomorrow after tilling one more time.

    What else should i add to the soil to help? I can get a pick up truck load of composted cow manure if needed. I was also thinking of getting some peat moss and vermiculite from home depot tomorrow as well but im not sure how much i need. I also have one load of wood chips from a tree service. It may be enough to get a 2 inch layer over the whole area. Would the mulch be a good idea?


    Thanks for your imput
     
  2. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Sandy soil is actually preferable for several types of veggies. Crops like root vegetables, lettuces, potatoes, leeks, and tomatoes all grow best in sandy soil. It's also better for growing herbs. Mulching is actually better for sandy soil than tilling it. Tilling can actually harm the microbial environment.
    I live on a huge sandbar. I know from experience that mulching is the way to go.
     
  3. Chic Rustler

    Chic Rustler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well thats good. I have already tilled it so theres no going back. Lol
    But it had very heavy plant growth on it.

    How do plants like corn, squash, peppers, and melons like sand?
     
  4. Chic Rustler

    Chic Rustler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, whats a good way to get rid of an ant pile in a garden?
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Ants are actually beneficial to the garden. The tunnels they dig give roots better airflow. Their scavenging efforts also help fertilize the soil.
     
  6. Chic Rustler

    Chic Rustler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I figured they would eat all the produce.
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Ants don't eat your fresh veggies. The most common pests in most North American gardens are cut worms (actually a moth larva), cabbage moths and their caterpillars, and slugs/snails.
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    Check out this video:
     
  9. Chic Rustler

    Chic Rustler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I ended up tilling in 500 lbs of black kow manure. It barely dusted the 1600 square feet. Then i planted corn, okra, tomatoes, bell peppers, pole beans, squash, zucchini, and cantaloupe. A little late in texas to be planting but better late than never.


    I took the timler back to the guy that loaned it to me and i plan on covering it with wood chips when everything has sprouted well.


    I guess after the growing season ill add a layer of compost on top and then cover with another layer of wood chips. Thats what the back to eden people say to do anyway.
     
  10. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you planting in regular rows or wider rows or beds? 1600sqft is a lot of ground to cover. Wider rows/beds will allow you to put your organic materials only on the growing area. 16 wide rows or beds that are 20'x3' with roughly 2' paths between would fit on the 40x40 plot. (I would cut the long 40' length half by a path bisecting the rows/bed, thus the sixteen 20' rows). Going with the scenario that I laid out would create a growing area of roughly 960 square feet which would save a ton (possibly literally) on organic matter, water, etc.,. Of course, you may already be doing this, but it seems you're talking about adding things to the full garden area. The wood chips might work really good in the paths. Just some thoughts.

    Best wishes,
    Ed
     
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