Chicken poppy

Songster
May 9, 2021
1,295
3,694
241
Connecticut
Hello! This is answer of the day #004 Chick Checklist where i do some information topics daily. (Or try to)
last post i ended up making errors and getting some information wrong, im not going to be doing major topics because i dont want to upset people or have potential errors. So i’ll stick with what i know. So i decided to make something easy yet informative! Chick checklist. Exactly what it sounds, a chicken check list to insure you have the right things for baby chicks.
as any animal would you will need food, water, a safe warm home and of course, the chicks!

i remember when i first got chicks (a while back) i was overloaded with information and didnt know what was true or false and what to do. So heres the basics.

Your first going to need something called a “Brooder” (as one option) So this depends the take you decide to do raising your chicks, Firstly, you could go the hen aproach, letting your mama raise her young herself and incubate them! Their great moms. Then, you could decide the more human version, Say this is your first time with chickens, maybe the moms arent old enough to incubate? Or for any other reasons. You can use the “Brooder” Technique. This is very common and is used with a lot of first time owners (And non first time owners to!) Its simply a small little “House” Cage thing, that holds the chicks to insure their safe and protected (and that they dont go running about your house!) so whats the difference? For starters, a mom is much cheaper already. If you did the hands on version, your investing in a incubator, brooder, and lots of time! But with the hen, its a built in incubator and brooder from the start! (Still, youll use your time to protect them, but not as much frantic running to every cheep) Some hens arent the best mothers, granted most of them are. but what i mean by this is they may be not as broody for their young, and possibly less fluffy, way way to young, etc. (Which fluff isnt a huge problem at all, but it helps keep them more warm and protected.) still, of course, many little fluff breeds raise excellent young. Your ideal type may be a fluffy hen that goes broody and isnt to aggressive. Shes friendly and nice and trusts you, (i say this because you may eventually take the eggs out to candle, so you dont want her to freak out! Though she probably will anyway, shes a protective mama! If she already trusts you, its a lot easier Vs you being a complete stranger and not knowing her whatsoever. If you already know the hen and are good with chickens you may know how to handle her and her young better and a gentle respecting touch, giving her her space and letting her do her thing.)


Next youll need good food, Ive noticed this with many people and it worries me a lot. Most people feed them non-feed, like just a bunch of oats and grains. while its not horrible for them, this is bad because at such a young age, 1 i wouldnt introduce treats that fast, or that many of course. And 2 they need to eat their meal and not random stuff. I feed my chickens occasional healthy treats, some oregano, a pinch of hemp. But i never did it when they were young, some people do, im sure its not bad to give treats at a young age, but try waiting a while til their older, and please, give them their meal! (I described this badly and its probably confusing, even if their older i dont recommend doing that at all, i just mean stay away from treats at a young age if you can, do not feed them oats for their pure diet.)
i know many people want specific brands, but im constantly forgetting mine and cant honestly give you great recommendation, i think manna pro is okay? I wouldn’t necessarily go all out saying its amazing, but ive given my chickens some of it (not as much recently for their main feed) and it has some broken insects in their for protein, which seems fine in small amounts, sense i think its one of the last ingredients in their anyway.


a huge thing i must stress. Baby chicks easily drown, by having a waterer (not a big water dish please, a waterer) may be a bit big for them and they could harm themselves. I recommend adding some (CLEAN, NOT SMALL) Rocks. dont let them be small please, i dont want your chickens accidentally swallowing them. big enough they cant get their beak around, and be sure that its clean, and not in a pile of dirt. maybe storebought may work nicely to insure theres nothing like bugs or germs on the rocks that can harm them (and try not to have them sharp either!) you add just a layer underneath IF (IF) its to deep. Some are perfectly find being okay because its not deep and a bunch of water, use your best judgment!

Lastly, two things.
1. Amount of chickens. If your looking for a nice recommendation of chicks then i find 6 to be a good number if you can manage it, but be sure you have a place to give the rooster if you dont plan on keeping it. Because always expect the worst, mine was Noisy, and i knew that from birth because he was the loudest one (but tottally friendly) so dont expect them all to be angelic fellows. Some are gentleman, some are noisy, some are bullies (more then a average bully) and some are straight up aggressive and mean and dislike interaction.
2. Please reply to this thread if your chick has poop on its butt, thats called “Pasty butt” Ive discussed this in a previous thread so im not going into detail, i will try to reply ASAP if you say yours has it. Basically, clean it off with a soft warm cloth in a circular (not pulling) motion on the chickens butt, and handle with care. Do not pull or tug feathers, it can injure them badly.
thats all for now and please point out if something is wrong, if something in here is, ill fix it ASAP.

extra thing to note: When using a water, be sure the lid on the top is on and its for baby chicks and not adults, this prevents accidents and may be much better for their health.

im not a vet, but this is research ive concluded. Again, if somethings wrong, please tell me and ill fix it.
 
Last edited:

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,261
36,143
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Hello! This is answer of the day #004 Chick Checklist where i do some information topics daily. (Or try to)
last post i ended up making errors and getting some information wrong, im not going to be doing major topics because i dont want to upset people or have potential errors. So i’ll stick with what i know. So i decided to make something easy yet informative! Chick checklist. Exactly what it sounds, a chicken check list to insure you have the right things for baby chicks.
as any animal would you will need food, water, a safe warm home and of course, the chicks!

i remember when i first got chicks (a while back) i was overloaded with information and didnt know what was true or false and what to do. So heres the basics.

Your first going to need something called a “Brooder” (as one option) So this depends the take you decide to do raising your chicks, Firstly, you could go the hen aproach, letting your mama raise her young herself and incubate them! Their great moms. Then, you could decide the more human version, Say this is your first time with chickens, maybe the moms arent old enough to incubate? Or for any other reasons. You can use the “Brooder” Technique. This is very common and is used with a lot of first time owners (And non first time owners to!) Its simply a small little “House” Cage thing, that holds the chicks to insure their safe and protected (and that they dont go running about your house!) so whats the difference? For starters, a mom is much cheaper already. If you did the hands on version, your investing in a incubator, brooder, and lots of time! But with the hen, its a built in incubator and brooder from the start! (Still, youll use your time to protect them, but not as much frantic running to every cheep) Some hens arent the best mothers, granted most of them are. but what i mean by this is they may be not as broody for their young, and possibly less fluffy, way way to young, etc. (Which fluff isnt a huge problem at all, but it helps keep them more warm and protected.) still, of course, many little fluff breeds raise excellent young. Your ideal type may be a fluffy hen that goes broody and isnt to aggressive. Shes friendly and nice and trusts you, (i say this because you may eventually take the eggs out to candle, so you dont want her to freak out! Though she probably will anyway, shes a protective mama! If she already trusts you, its a lot easier Vs you being a complete stranger and not knowing her whatsoever. If you already know the hen and are good with chickens you may know how to handle her and her young better and a gentle respecting touch, giving her her space and letting her do her thing.)


Next youll need good food, Ive noticed this with many people and it worries me a lot. Most people feed them non-feed, like just a bunch of oats and grains. while its not horrible for them, this is bad because at such a young age, 1 i wouldnt introduce treats that fast, or that many of course. And 2 they need to eat their meal and not random stuff. I feed my chickens occasional healthy treats, some oregano, a pinch of hemp. But i never did it when they were young, some people do, im sure its not bad, but try waiting a while til their older, and please, give them their meal! (I described this badly and its probably confusing, even if their older i dont recommend doing that at all, i just mean stay away from treats at a young age if you can)
i know many people want specific brands, but im constantly forgetting mine and cant honestly give you great recommendation, i think manna pro is okay? I wouldn’t necessarily go all out saying its amazing, but ive given my chickens some of it (not as much recently for their main feed) and it has some broken insects in their for protein, which seems fine in small amounts, sense i think its one of the last ingredients in their anyway.


a huge thing i must stress. Baby chicks easily drown, by having a waterer (not a big water dish please, a waterer) may be a bit big for them and they could harm themselves. I recommend adding some (CLEAN, NOT SMALL) Rocks. dont let them be small please, i dont want your chickens accidentally swallowing them. big enough they cant get their beak around, and be sure that its clean, and not in a pile of dirt. maybe storebought may work nicely to insure theres nothing like bugs or germs on the rocks that can harm them (and try not to have them sharp either!) you add just a layer underneath IF (IF) its to deep. Some are perfectly find being okay because its not deep and a bunch of water, use your best judgment!

Lastly, two things.
1. Amount of chickens. If your looking for a nice recommendation of chicks then i find 6 to be a good number if you can manage it, but be sure you have a place to give the rooster if you dont plan on keeping it. Because always expect the worst, mine was Noisy, and i knew that from birth because he was the loudest one (but tottally friendly) so dont expect them all to be angelic fellows. Some are gentleman, some are noisy, some are bullies (more then a average bully) and some are straight up aggressive and mean and dislike interaction.
2. Please reply to this thread if your chick has poop on its butt, thats called “Pasty butt” Ive discussed this in a previous thread so im not going into detail, i will try to reply ASAP if you say yours has it. Basically, clean it off with a soft warm cloth in a circular (not pulling) motion on the chickens butt, and handle with care. Do not pull or tug feathers, it can injure them badly.
thats all for now and please point out if something is wrong, if something in here is, ill fix it ASAP.

extra thing to note: When using a water, be sure the lid on the top is on and its for baby chicks and not adults, this prevents accidents and may be much better for their health.

im not a vet, but this is research ive concluded. Again, if somethings wrong, please tell me and ill fix it.
This is wonderfully written! Very informative. Thank you!

And I have a question, I have a few adult hens who have poop stuck to their feathers and butt, but not always blocking the vent. So I don’t worry too much into it.
But is this pasty butt I am dealing with? If so, will it effect them down the line if not removed hastily? And how can I prevent it?
 

Chicken poppy

Songster
May 9, 2021
1,295
3,694
241
Connecticut
This is wonderfully written! Very informative. Thank you!

And I have a question, I have a few adult hens who have poop stuck to their feathers and butt, but not always blocking the vent. So I don’t worry too much into it.
But is this pasty butt I am dealing with? If so, will it effect them down the line if not removed hastily? And how can I prevent it?
Pasty butt is often caused by stress in chickens! A major thing i worry about is if its very visable it can be picked off by other chickens (pulling it from them, causing injuries) it can be a bit bad for their egg production considering the poop might get on the eggs. which I believe could get them germy and less chances of hatching. If their hens it should not be pasty butt, i think that only accurs in young chicks. I put some gloves on my hands and got luke tempature water and rubbed it off how i would a baby chick and was sure to be gentle and dry it after. this is actually a bit common in chickens, they have so much fluff on their behind poop just gets stuck on it! Its best to try to treat it before it gets to late (could get harder and a bit harder to get off) i hope this helps! :D As long as its not diherrea and she doesnt seem ill (just being a worry wart 🤣) she should be totally find and just be sure its not on the vent hole.
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,261
36,143
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Pasty butt is often caused by stress in chickens! A major thing i worry about is if its very visable it can be picked off by other chickens (pulling it from them, causing injuries) it can be a bit bad for their egg production considering the poop might get on the eggs. which I believe could get them germy and less chances of hatching. If their hens it should not be pasty butt, i think that only accurs in young chicks. I put some gloves on my hands and got luke tempature water and rubbed it off how i would a baby chick and was sure to be gentle and dry it after. this is actually a bit common in chickens, they have so much fluff on their behind poop just gets stuck on it! Its best to try to treat it before it gets to late (could get harder and a bit harder to get off) i hope this helps! :D
Ah, thank you! Okay. I will try and go out tomorrow and round up a couple of the hens and get some of the dry dung off their butts.
 

Chicken poppy

Songster
May 9, 2021
1,295
3,694
241
Connecticut
Ah, thank you! Okay. I will try and go out tomorrow and round up a couple of the hens and get some of the dry dung off their butts.
Okay! let me know how it goes! My girl had some poop on her butt hidden under the fluff, where it wasnt visable. That got me a little worried because i could only see it when she did her “poop squat” because she has so much fluff. Just to be safe, id look at some fluffy chickens to make sure they dont have some hidden! :) :) (Or if thats what your already doing.)
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,261
36,143
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Okay! let me know how it goes! My girl had some poop on her butt hidden under the fluff, where it wasnt visable. That got me a little worried because i could only see it when she did her “poop squat” because she has so much fluff. Just to be safe, id look at some fluffy chickens to make sure they dont have some hidden! :) :) (Or if thats what your already doing.)
Of course! In Situations like that, when it gets really icky, I make a warm bath, use some gentle soap, and if needed cut off the poopy feathers. But I may have to be careful with the ones I am speaking of in particular. Is there something I can use to help unstick the big chunks?
 

Chicken poppy

Songster
May 9, 2021
1,295
3,694
241
Connecticut
Of course! In Situations like that, when it gets really icky, I make a warm bath, use some gentle soap, and if needed cut off the poopy feathers. But I may have to be careful with the ones I am speaking of in particular. Is there something I can use to help unstick the big chunks?
Thats sounds like a good idea! The things i used to preform “poopy surgery“ was gloves, que-tips, luke warm water and gentle trimmers for the cotton fluff in major poopy areas. For big chunks you may want to take a que-tip thats dipped in the warm water and break it up like that. It sounds really gross but its a lot better then going in with your fingers and breaks it up much better in my opinion. (Of course, not like touching their skin with it, just the feathery poopy parts) If theres a big part that isnt close to the skin, you can try using some natural baby wipes (on the poop) to try and break it up, (not pulling, just a gentle rub) i found that helped me in some places with larger spots. hopefully this can help :D
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,261
36,143
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Thats sounds like a good idea! The things i used to preform “poopy surgery“ was gloves, que-tips, luke warm water and gentle trimmers for the cotton fluff in major poopy areas. For big chunks you may want to take a que-tip thats dipped in the warm water and break it up like that. It sounds really gross but its a lot better then going in with your fingers and breaks it up much better in my opinion. (Of course, not like touching their skin with it, just the feathery poopy parts) If theres a big part that isnt close to the skin, you can try using some natural baby wipes (on the poop) to try and break it up, (not pulling, just a gentle rub) i found that helped me in some places with larger spots. hopefully this can help :D
Alright! I will keep this in mind when I go into poopy surgery tomorrow! 😉👩‍⚕️
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
16,136
33,563
861
South-Eastern Montana
Most people feed them non-feed, like just a bunch of oats and grains. while its not horrible for them, this is bad because at such a young age,
Most people isn't really accurate. Most people with the ability feed them poultry feed. If they can't, that's a different scenerio. And just grains is horrible for them. It's a very unbalanced diet that does not have all they need, even as adults
 

Chicken poppy

Songster
May 9, 2021
1,295
3,694
241
Connecticut
Most people isn't really accurate. Most people with the ability feed them poultry feed. If they can't, that's a different scenerio. And just grains is horrible for them. It's a very unbalanced diet that does not have all they need, even as adults
As i had said after i said that {quoting exactly what i said here} (I described this badly and its probably confusing, even if their older i dont recommend doing that at all, i just mean stay away from treats at a young age if you can) i was saying its not horrible to give them grains, but i said i recommend staying away from treats at a young age if you can. :) I dont support any type of vegan animal, (vegan being no protein or anything, just a pure grain diet or not providing proper food for them, like giving them no bugs, insect protein and just oatsl) especially so if their not freeranged (even though its both bad) unless its actually supposed to Be “vegan” like hamsters Which dont require things like bugs and meat. that diet for dogs, cats, and poultry is very sad. ( i was saying grains aren’t horrible for them, but again as i said after i tried clearing it up.)
 
Last edited:

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