Anyone try sneaking babies under a broody hen?

chikadeedoodah

Songster
10 Years
Apr 23, 2009
128
0
119
Hi there,
I have a couple of hens that aren't broody yet, but they got broody last year (as pullets), and will likely be broody (or attempt it) when my chicks come from the hatchery in late April. Anyone have any luck in sneaking 25 chicks under some broody hens? If so, how'd you do it? Was it a success? I assume that I'll have to brooder these babies, but hey if I can get "Pippi" or "Ms. Skinny" to do the work for me, I'm thinking... why not?
 

ThePamperedPullet

Songster
11 Years
Oct 4, 2008
2,337
32
181
North Central Florida
We have three hens that love to be mommies and so it is really easy to slip a few extras under them. It is much easier if they are hatching their own eggs at the same time. We have new chicks hatching all the time around here from the bators and so when the broodies eggs start hatching we will take a handful of day olds down and slip them under them. Our one hen cared for 27 chicks at one time this past fall. It will depend a lot on the hen. You will know right away if she is going to accept them or not.
 

Pumpkinpup

Poultry Princess
11 Years
Jul 16, 2008
4,147
30
256
North-West Georgia
Sure, I have done it many times. I always do it at night when it is pitch black and late enough that the hen is pretty well out of it. I just slip the peeps under her and when she wakes up, Instant Family!
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Works well this way. Less chance of her rejecting the new brood.
 

Kajunbanty

Songster
11 Years
Sep 14, 2008
114
1
122
I did it just this past week. My brother came home with 6 chicks and I had a hen that was trying to go broody. I set up a place for her with a nesting box, food and water and a light because we have had some cold nights here in Louisiana. I moved the hen in around dusk and let her get settle, then once it was good and dark I went out and slipped the chicks under her. I went back out once more to check on her but all seem fine. Next morning she was up scratching and teaching them how to eat. She is taking care of them just like she had hatched them when in truth she had only been broody a few days. This is how my grandmother did her new chicks each year she always ordered about 50 new ones a year.
 

chikadeedoodah

Songster
10 Years
Apr 23, 2009
128
0
119
Hooray! Love the inspiration and success stories. I'm definitely going to do this when I get my babies (of course it is likely that my hens won't cooperate and will only get broody well after I have the babies in the brooder...) How do you separate a broody hen from the pack? I have an extra large dog kennel that I can line on the bottom so rascally chicks can't get out, is that enough?
 

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