Apple cider vinegar - what does it do and how much to give?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by LampreyGirls, Jan 26, 2010.

  1. LampreyGirls

    LampreyGirls Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 12, 2010
    Lee
    I've read that apple cider vinegar helps laying chickens in a number of ways..... what exactly does it do? How much to give and when?
     
  2. Brianm97

    Brianm97 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 17, 2009
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    i think it is for wormin im a noob so dont hold me to it
     
  3. Eliza

    Eliza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Organic apple cider vinegar is very good for your birds. It makes the system acidic and that's good for keep harmful bacteria down in the digestive tract. It puts a hard gloss on the feathers, helps birds with stress and gets them through molt quicker. the ratio is 100ml /gallon of water. Organic or unpasterized apple cider has what's called the "mother" in it, which is why it is cloudy. this is good. pasterized is ok too, but not a benefical. google it and read up. it's good for us too!
     
  4. Heidi

    Heidi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 18, 2007
    Northwest Michigan
    When I give my hens AVC - I mix 1 capful per gallon of water. It seems to make them more bright eyed and alert - not to mention healthy and shiny feathers. You can usually get the unpasturized AVC from your local heath store.
     
  5. JimWWhite

    JimWWhite Chillin' With My Peeps

    I add about a quarter cup to my four gallon waterer when I fill it. It helps keep the algae down in the summer plus I think it helps keep the Gals healthy. I read it's good for their digestion as well as their feathers. I only use apple cider vinegar and never in a galvanized container. I swear by it.
     
  6. edselpdx

    edselpdx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Portland, OR
    I personally think that there's no good evidence out there to support the use of ACV. Lots of people are sure that it's a cure-all, but please do your own research to your own level of comfort. People talk about it "acidifying the system", etc, but a normal body (human or chicken) takes care of its own acid/base balance without the addition of "acidifiers", so there's no reason to add it to a system. In humans, you can acidify/alkalize urine but not "the system" with some foods/additives; intake doesn't change the acid/base balance in the body significantly. If you chose to use ACV after your own research, don't use it in galvanized waterers, as it can release excessive zinc into the water from the galvanizing process. Life processes can only occur in a very narrow range of acid/base balance, and adding acid to diet does not change the acid/base balance of the body as a whole.

    As far as "natural" ways to treat your flock, do look into dry DE in bedding to help prevent external parasites, though, in lieu of sevin dust and other pesticides which make their way into the chicken, their eggs, and you. Food grade DE is a great alternative to pesticides for external parasites; it is used in the bedding/coop as a loose powder. It works by nicking the exoskeletons of the mites/lice/fleas and causing them to die of dehydration. There is no good evidence that is works as an internal wormer, despite many claims otherwise.

    I know I've just invited a huge war here, but wanted to add a voice of reason to the ACV + DE debates.
     
  7. Garden Gal

    Garden Gal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've just started using ACV, and can only say this: the water in their three gallon containers does not "sour". Prior to the ACV every time I changed the water, the container had a "yuck" smell. This has been eliminated by the use of ACV. Coincidentally, the first day after using the ACV my 20 hens laid 20 eggs, but i KNOW this was simply good timing and can not be attributed to anything other than plain, dumb luck. I plan on keeping it up and documenting any changes I can note, but figure it can't hurt; might help.
     
  8. LampreyGirls

    LampreyGirls Out Of The Brooder

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    Lee
    Thanks for the info on ACV. I'm new to this chicken stuff - what is DE?
     
  9. edselpdx

    edselpdx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Agreed, if you want to keep your waterer "fresh" any kind of vinegar, including white vinegar or ACV, would do the trick, as would a few drops of bleach. Certainly, I agree that ACV can't/won't hurt your flock in any way when used as recommended around here (a capful or two in a big waterer isn't going to change the water significantly). It just seems like an extra, unnecessary expense and hassle to me with no proven health effects.

    DE is diatomaceous earth. Do a search on the site for many opinions. Just be sure it's FOOD grade and not swimming pool DE. I use a few tablespoons in the litter of the coop every few weeks, and rub it on the roost (where mites can live) as a safe, non-toxic preventative to lice/mites. Be sure NOT to breath it in and use in moderation. I personally try to avoid poisons like sevin dust and the like, so if I can prevent an infestation with a proven natural product, I will.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  10. henney penny

    henney penny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have used ACV two years now,I use 1 TBL to one gallon water.My hens lay all winter,have never seen any worms in there poo,they are so healty and and active.
     

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