Are these signs of bloated belly syndrome?

The Mother Hen

Chirping
6 Years
Jul 10, 2013
113
6
71
I had a chick who was really big in size (I'm unsure about the sex). It wasn't able to stand, and it's belly was really large. Today I noticed that the vent was leaking clear and yellow liquid, and the vent kept pulsing because the baby was trying to get the liquid out. The breathing of the chick slowed, and it became weaker and weaker. Now the chick is buried in my backyard, so I want your answers for future use.
 

BantamLover21

Crowing
7 Years
Jul 24, 2013
23,660
1,566
426
I had a chick who was really big in size (I'm unsure about the sex). It wasn't able to stand, and it's belly was really large. Today I noticed that the vent was leaking clear and yellow liquid, and the vent kept pulsing because the baby was trying to get the liquid out. The breathing of the chick slowed, and it became weaker and weaker. Now the chick is buried in my backyard, so I want your answers for future use.

I'm not sure what "bloated belly syndrome is". Are you possibly thinking of Omphalitis, also known as mushy chick disease or yolk sac infection? Symptoms of Omphalitis are incompletely healed navel, fluid under skin, a mushy abdomen, and unabsorbed yolk (sometimes the yolk is yellowish green and watery, or yellowish brown, cheese-like, and bad smelling). It sounds like your chick showed at least a few of these symptoms.

Omphalitis is caused by E. coli or Staphylococcus bacteria that invade an egg during incubation. It is spread by contaminated droppings on hatching eggs and/or infectious organisms in the incubator; the bacteria enter the chick through an unhealed navel. To prevent Omphalitis, only set clean eggs, control incubator humidity (high humidity can cause unhealed navels), and clean and disinfect the incubator between hatches. If this chick was bought from a hatchery or breeder, you might want to notify them about this problem so that they can go about trying to fix it.

I'm sorry for the loss of your chick.
hugs.gif
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
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I can't speak for TheMotherHen, but I assume she is talking about ascites, when fluid collects in the abdomen from eggyolk peritonitis or liver failure.
 

BantamLover21

Crowing
7 Years
Jul 24, 2013
23,660
1,566
426
I can't speak for TheMotherHen, but I assume she is talking about ascites, when fluid collects in the abdomen from eggyolk peritonitis or liver failure.

That is a possibility, but she was talking about a chick. I've always thought that ascites occurred in older birds.
 

The Mother Hen

Chirping
6 Years
Jul 10, 2013
113
6
71
Quote:
Omphalitis is caused by E. coli or Staphylococcus bacteria that invade an egg during incubation. It is spread by contaminated droppings on hatching eggs and/or infectious organisms in the incubator; the bacteria enter the chick through an unhealed navel. To prevent Omphalitis, only set clean eggs, control incubator humidity (high humidity can cause unhealed navels), and clean and disinfect the incubator between hatches. If this chick was bought from a hatchery or breeder, you might want to notify them about this problem so that they can go about trying to fix it.

I'm sorry for the loss of your chick.
hugs.gif


Thanks so much, and Bloated belly syndrome is the same as mushy belly! I think its egg did have fecal matter on it, but I cleared it off before it hatched. I will clean out the nesting box again just in case. Also, I am hatching the chickens outside.
 

MANNA-PRO

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