At what age do the chicks will not need the brooder lamp anymore?

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by M To The Maxx, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. M To The Maxx

    M To The Maxx Baseball+Girls=Life

    Jul 24, 2009
    Lutz,FL
    At what age do the chicks will not need the brooder lamp anymore? Mine are about 2 weeks old.
     
  2. gkeesling

    gkeesling Chillin' With My Peeps

    398
    0
    129
    Nov 24, 2008
    Hagerstown, IN
    i gradually reduced the eat by about 5 degees a week in my brooder area until it got down to about 70 degrees. By then the chicks are pretty well feathered and won't need the heat lamp any more.
     
  3. MaggieRae

    MaggieRae Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 12, 2009
    North Texas
    Generally you decrease by 5 degrees every week and you start out at 95 degrees for the first week. So at the second week, you should be about 90 degrees. If you continue decreasing by 5 degrees every week, you take it off them when you've hit room/ outdoor temperature.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. americana-chick

    americana-chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,487
    31
    211
    Jun 18, 2008
    Once they are fully feathered i just take out the heat lamp but mine are inside the house so still stay pretty toasty.
     
  5. Serrin

    Serrin Chillin' With My Peeps

    A lot depends on where you're keeping them Maxx. If outdoors, (i.e. outdoor coop, barn, unheated garage) a good rule of thumb is this: If the chicks seem to stay huddled directly under the lamp, chances are good that the temps beyond the sphere of influence of the lamp are too cold for their liking.

    If the chicks are scattered about and acting lively, then the chances are good that the temps are just right. In that case, leave the lamp just as it is.

    If however, they appear to be trying to avoid the lamp, are lethargic, and spend a great deal of time with their beaks open, then it's very likely that the temps are too high. If this is the case, back the lamp away a bit (suspend it higher above the brooder) and monitor closely.

    When brooding chicks outdoors, temps can change drastically and suddenly, so close monitoring is your best friend.

    I can't recall with any certainty at what age chicks begin to be able to regulate their own body temperature Maxx. That sounds like a really good question for someone like Speckledhen or maybe Cetawin. Katy could probably answer that better for you too.

    We haven't seen pics of them in a while. How about some visual updates? [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by