Avia Charge 2000 or Pro Charge, which one is better?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Gelfling, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    I would really appreciate any advice anyone could give on this:

    For those that just want the quick and dirty, I would like advice on two things. First, recommendations on breeds that are docile, friendly, and less prone to bad behaviors like picking and cannabilism, as well as being cold hardy. I want egg layers but its not as important that they be supreme egg machines as get along well and be able to handle winter temps as I free range as much as I can and I dont want to worry. Secondly I am hoping someone out there has information about pro charge vs avia charge 2000. Anyone have preferences, could I use them together or would that be overkill? is one better than the other? Will either really help my hen stop pecking the other?

    The low-down:
    I have had problems with pecking recently within my small flock of four. They are a rhode Island Red/New Hampshire red mix. We got them last may as four month old hens. The trouble started a couple months ago. We got rid of the meanest one, found a home for her where a friend was all too stoked at the chance to rehabilitate. miranda is doing great now by the way, no troubles anymore. I was hoping I had culled her in time but alas I did not. The second one to go mean was Charlotte and she was way worse. She was originally my favorite chicken but that changed as she pecked huge holes in the others backs, between the feathers. particularly kept bloodying up Samantha. I tried everything but it didnt stop her so she went away as well. now I am left with just the two, Carrie and Samantha.

    Samantha is the sweetest thing, very gentle, well behaved and a great egg layer. Carrie is now feather picking off her butt every day, she isnt as mean as the other two were but i am worried its only a matter of time. So far she hasnt broken her skin like Charlotte was doing thank god! I would just ship her off too as my friend is all too eager for her eggs, but I know Samantha hates to be alone. She panicks every time i have to separate them due to Carrie's picking. So I am trying to salvage Carrie's behavior as best as I can at least until spring when I can get new hens to replenish the flock. I would love some advice as to which breeds i should look into as regards to a docile temperament, hardiness, and cold-hardiness as it gets cold here. I dont care as much about wether they lay lots of eggs as much as wether I am going to have to deal with constant chicken drama as it breaks my heart and is quite frustrating.

    Here is what I have been doing: I feed them layer crumbles and they are available to them 24/7 as there is a feeder in the coop and in the tractor. I recently switched from layer pellets to crumbles due to tips on here about how it may lessen the desire to peck because it takes them longer to eat, avoids boredom. In addition to the food they have free-choice grit and oyster shell, and I hide boss daily in leafs. They get the occasional scratch but not often and in small doses, and frequent additions of kitchen scraps mainly fruits/veggie/grain stuff but occasional meat and dairy product makes it in. I have been trying to include more meat for the protien as of late. I move them from the 10 x 30 garden area run off the coop to a small chicken tractor that we move around the yard for sun and lawn exposure, and to stave of boredom, I hang apples and cabbages in both the tractor and the coop, I have a flock block in the coop, and i apply the pick no more daily sometimes multiple times. I keep thinking I have it under control but everything is temporary. she goes back to pecking almost as soon as Samantha has cleaned off the pick no more because she hates it.

    The only two things I havent tried are the hot pick spray which I am about to order online as none of the local stores carry it, and the avia charge 2000. Many on this forum have said that these two products are often effective in helping eliminate pecking. In my search for avia charge 2000 I came accross Pro charge and wondered if that may be a good alternative to avia charge 2000. I am a little concerned about the fact that it is a water additive as it is winter and the water freezes and as I break it up I throw ice out which seems to me like I would be tossing out expensive avia charge instead of just a bit of easily replaced and inexpensive water. The Pro charge is something that can be mixed in with the feed but the avia charge does seem to be more of a well rounded supplement from the description. Could I give them both or would that be overkill?

    Any opinions on this? I want to make sure I am doing everything I can for my chickens, any additional suggestions are most welcome.

    edited for title content
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 4, 2009
  2. Chicken Chat

    Chicken Chat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2009
    Southern Illinois
    Gelfling,
    I had RIRs for 9 years and never had a pecking issue as the one that you describe so I have never used Avia Charge or Pro Charge. In my experience, RIRs are rather docile. Maybe it's in your mix. Sorry I can't help you there, maybe someone else can.
    It sounds like your girls are well taken care of, I hope someone else can answer your question.
     
  3. emys

    emys Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    Idaho
    One thought I have for you is when you are using expensive water additives, use a heated water bowl. Then you won't have to throw any out (unless they poop in it - which can happen).

    There are lots of more docile breeds, but as I'm sure you know they aren't always the best layers (check breeds charts). Good luck.
     
  4. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    I have thought about a heated waterer, my problem is that I dont have an easy way to put electricity out there as our outside outlets aren't currently working. [​IMG] This is something that will need to be addressed.
     
  5. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    Quote:Thanks Chicken Chat, I agree I think it is in the mix. That's why I think I will be getting a completely different breed when I replace the three. I say three because i have already gifted two of the oneryest hens but I am feeling that Carrie will have to go eventually as well. I am wondering if when I get rid of Carrie and get new hens in with Samantha if she will indeed develop those same tendencies against the new hens, or if the cycle will begin anew with her still at the bottom of the pecking order. I want to give her a chance to grow back her feathers so she isnt an obvious target before placing new hens in with her. How long does it take a hen to grow her picked and broken feathers back? agh, so many questions. I want to do this swap right as I do not want to go through this again if I can help it.
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    I suggest you get the aviacharge (as I dont know anything about the "pro-charge" )
    Dont put it in their waterer but mix it in with a cup of cooked human oatmeal and then mix that through their feed along with some cooked boiled egg and some sunflowerseed hearts > mix just enough feed in with that till it is clumpy and then after they have eaten it all give them their normal feed.
    Personally I would find new homes for the problem birds (separate them until you do) , then expand your flock with another breed (which I understand you are looking for).

    Birds are intelligent and they get bored. Also providing them with more than one feeding and water station (a good distance from each other) will ensure everyone gets their share.

    As far as table scraps goes... your birds will wait for these. Try not to give too much and not every day (if you do the chances are high your birds will simply wait for these goodies and that means they are irritable and hungry when it comes along and that might be one reason they are fighting)
     
  7. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    Quote:Thanks emys, I will check out the breeds charts. I have a lot of research ahead of me. I am hoping to get some personal experience stories from people as well.

    I am thinking I will have to convince my partner that it is indeed imperitive to get those outside electrical sockets reconnected so we can hook up a heated watering system for them. We have several waterers in different locations for them but the one they like the best and I do as well is the five gallon bucket that catches the rain water. It would be hard to hook that up to a heater but its easy to knock through the top ice layer for them. The little buckets that worked so well in summer arent cutting it as well now that its so cold. The one gravity waterer I have i just dismanteled due to freezing as I dont want it to split and they hadnt been using it much but that would be the one I would have put the avia charge in.
     
  8. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    Quote:Thanks dlhunicorn! I dont give them table scraps every day, I kinda space it out. Its generally when I have just prepared a huge batch of soup or stew or some such and have the stuff i would normally have thrown into the compost, like the skins or seeds, etc. Or leftovers. Its very sporadic but i have noticed that they havent been going back into their coop much lately for their food, they wait till they get to the tractor to eat their feed. the rest of the time in the run they scratch everywhere looking for BOSS and bugs and worms. This is something that has slowly developed over the last few weeks. pretty much since I started really getting serious about adding more stuff for them to do. Perhaps I have trained them too well accidentally to spend all day looking for BOSS instead of eating their food? I have been seperating them more these days. getting Samantha used to being by herself more and giving her a break from Carrie. i cant seperate them overnight though as they only have the one winterized roosting area.

    Thank you for the idea to make the oatmeal mash, I think i will try that [​IMG]
     
  9. Chicken Chat

    Chicken Chat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern Illinois
    You may have to wait till the next molt before she grows all of them back. I have some bantams that were constantly pulling the neck feathers off of only one of my other girls that is the lowest in the pecking order. She always had a naked neck, all the time. This summer I started putting ACV in their water and I truly believe it helped her grow her feathers back faster. Now, no more naked neck. You could try it, I give mine 1 Tablespoon to a gallon of water.
    I know some folks use a chicken saddle on their hens, it protects the hens backs from rooster nails but you can also use one to cover a wound on the back as protection. If you are handy with a needle and thread, try this site http://backtobasicliving.com/blog/make-a-chicken-saddle/ I am getting ready to make one this weekend, otherwise there are some on this forum that sell them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2009
  10. Gelfling

    Gelfling New Egg

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    Eugene
    Quote:Thanks again Chicken Chat,

    How often do hens molt? Apple Cider Vinegar? huh, I never thought of giving it to my hens but I have tried drinking a tonic with 1-2 tsps in a glass of water and it does wonders for the hair and skin, not to mention the nervous system, etc, etc...I will definitely give that a shot, but i wont add the touch of honey i add to mine [​IMG] I have heard of chicken saddles but never seen one. I am going to research these. If they offer her some protection from pecks and cold while her feathers are regrowing then I am all for it. I wonder how hens react to having this placed on them? Does it cover the tail feathers? i gotta find a picture...
     

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