Baby Chicken Cant Stand, Neck Sideways, Small Protrusion (Pictures)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PaintedGemsRanch, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. PaintedGemsRanch

    PaintedGemsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Hamilton, Georgia
    Ok Im not sure what to do here, Im turning to you knowledgeable people for help! This baby was born around 3PM yesterday. When he came out of the egg I noticed a protrusion coming from what I assumed was the umbilical area, its about as round as a pencil, a half inch long, orange/yellow color (yolk?), and hard. He didnt stand and laid on his side, which I thought was normal at first, being a new born. Well I continued to check on him and did my final check before I went to bed, still no progress. I decided to remove everyone that hatched yesterday and leave him there to possibly absorb what I assumed was the rest of the yolk and not get picked on. Still no change this morning. During this time I have noticed the following: He cant stand, still has the "protrusion", flails his legs, keeps his neck and head to the right side, and chirps like crazy! I took a short video to help explain! Any help is greatly appreciated!!!!! I am willing to help him go if that is what is needed [​IMG] Video is uploading now and will post it as soon as it finishes!
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2009
  2. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Have you picked him up? Is the protrusion stuck to the bottom of the incubator? What you are looking at is probably a portion of his yolk sac, which did not internalize before he hatched like it was supposed to. These will often get stuck to things- and the bird will herniate further through the 'umbilical' opening. The yolk sac is attached to the intestines- which is what herniates out. If it has the ability to pull the material in- it probably would have done so in the first hour or so after hatch. Sometimes these (if very small) will dry up and fall off. More often the larger ones won't and the area gets infected (poop contamination ect), and the chick dies in a few weeks- or they herniate more and die faster. I cull chicks with external yolk- if they do not internalize them immediately after hatch. I do not want any possible genetic tendency passed on. Options for your chick 1) cull 2) get vet help- with cleaning, tying off, closing hole, ect 3) attempt to do it yourself 4) wait and see what happens- keep chick on a moist paper towel to try to prevent sticking if the thing is long enough to touch the ground. this may end in sadness, or the chick may do ok- can't know this unless tried.
    If the chick can't stand on it's own with some help after 2 days, there is likely something else wrong with it. Though if the material is stuck to the incubator bottom- it won' t be able to get up either- so check on that first.
     
  3. PaintedGemsRanch

    PaintedGemsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Hamilton, Georgia
    Picklebird, Thank you for your response!!! Yes I have picked him up. No its not stuck.. its dry and hard. I have him out of the bator in the brooder with heat (separate from the rest of the chicks so he doesnt get picked on). He is actually in a baby wipe container in the brooder [​IMG] I have a thermometer in with him so I can monitor how hot he gets. I offered him watered down feed via syringe and he gladly took it. I also gave him 2 drops of poly-vi-sol vitamins. I held him up while he ate and stood on both legs. He has strength and fight. I checked where the yolk is at, it has completely dried around the opening. Its not opened, bloody or seapy. Im a stay at home mom and dont mind doing what it takes save him. I guess ill just go to him every hour and feed her until he hopefully gains his strength. Im not looking at breeding him, our chickens are just for our pleasure, so passing it on would not be an issue for us. Culling is an option if that is what is best also taking him the the vet might be an option (up to the husband). He still cant seem to get his legs under him though. I think alot has to do with his neck. Is it possible he has a "stiff neck" from trying to hatch for 24 hours.. he was the first to pip and the last to get out, because he hatched with his head under his right wing and thats the side it stays on... hmm...

    Anyone else have an opinion?
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2009
  4. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Me again, but try to get him into a normal position and keep him there. The baby wipe container is fine, or a strawberry basket. Coil papertowels around to make a nest shape. You want his legs under him, and his body upright. If his his head or neck is sore from an awkward hatch- he may feel better in 24-48 hrs. I had one with a 'puffy' head that took longer to hatch- I think he had edema due to bad positioning in the egg- he could not stand for 24 hrs and I had him propped in a strawberry basket. He looked and acted normal 24 hr later- and got out of the basket himself. Yours has the other problem as well- which could be related. If his yolk for some reason was attached to the egg shell on the inside, it would have been hard for him to to rotate in the shell and hatch. He also would have a hard time pulling his yolk in. The yolk can settle to one side of the egg if it is not turned often before or during incubation. These eggs usually do not make it to hatch. How old were the eggs prior to incubation & did you have an auto turner?
     
  5. PaintedGemsRanch

    PaintedGemsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Hamilton, Georgia
    On my way to make a nest! I peeked at him just now and he was standing but leaning against the container.. better then this morning! Maybe hes just slap wore out... ??? I helped him out of his shell (chipped away some of the shell and the membrane because it was soooo tough), was I wrong to do that.. did i hurt him? I was really concerned that it had been around 36 hours since he pipped. His breathing was labored and the other chicks kept rolling his egg... I was afraid he would get all turned around... Oh I hope Im not the cause of this.... [​IMG] These eggs were fresh (maybe a couple days old), not shipped, delivered actually lol, and yes an auto turner.

    Edit to add... I cant get the video to upload .... ahhh.. here are 2 pictures though to show his/her neck.. and upon doing a feather sex check.. i think its a girl [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2009
  6. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    You helped him as he was not able- but often the ones that can't get out on their own- couldn't get out because there was something wrong with them. Many serious hatchers do not help anyone out- but yes, it is hard to ignore a struggling chick. If is was badly positioned- he may get better, but if he has some orthopedic/anatomic problem- he may be able to live, but not be 'normal'. Shouldn't hurt to give him more time....
     
  7. PaintedGemsRanch

    PaintedGemsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Hamilton, Georgia
    Thank you for being the only one to respond! I knew I shouldnt of helped her but it was my first hatch and it killed me to see her "stuck". I think I will do better next time! I will continue to help as long as she is not suffering, although if she hasnt made any progress by the end of the week I will do what I feel is best [​IMG] ... She is still willing to drink from the dropper and ill be looking for stool tonight! How many times a day should i give the vitamins? and is 2 drops ok?
     
  8. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Don't feel bad about helping- many people do (I do sometimes). It is really hard to ignore a live/struggling chick that appears to have no hope of getting out on it's own. I sort of feel like- they made it to NOW, I would like to see what they can do. One can always end it's life later if it is necessary. If one is breeding to improve the stock, they certainly do want to not promote weak chicks. If you don't plan to pass on it's genes and are prepared to humanely cull if needs be- not a big deal in my book to help a chick. I would give her water 4-6 times a day, or more often if he/she will take it. Not to worry for the first 2-3 days on eating- she has yolk to live off for that long. She may take small pieces of chick food made into a soft mash if you put it in her beak. They learn to eat by pecking and picking at things- peck at the food with your finger to stimulate her, as she can't see her sibs. If her neck does not straighten out by a week or two, it probably won't. She may be able to eat/drink- if she can see and learn to balance--- and be fine on her own- but will look odd. Monitor her umbilical area, make sure she can keep her feet under her most of the time. Check to make sure she doesn't have splay leg. Vitamin drops 1-2 drops in the beak for a few days won't hurt. (do you have the often recommended poly-vi-sol or something else?).
     
  9. PaintedGemsRanch

    PaintedGemsRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Hamilton, Georgia
    She is only taking really watered down feed right now, from a dropper. I set her in with the rest next to the feed and water and observed. They didnt pick on her but since she has no balance knocked her over. She fell head first in the water and it came out her nose. Really scared me, wont be doing that again. Hopefully it didnt get in her lungs [​IMG] I will continue the feed regimen and vitamins (Yes they are the poly-vi-sols with no iron. Can she have these throughout the day or just once? Oh and good news, she is standing on her own. Shes wobbly but its because of her neck. Only time will tell! Again thank you soooo much for your reply's!
     
  10. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Maybe some gentle massage around her neck several times a day might be of benefit to her.
     

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