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Baby peafowl sick

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by Teepea, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. Teepea

    Teepea Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 28, 2014
    Melbourne, Tyabb
    Lots of protein in dog biscuits
     
  2. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You baby's problem doesn't sound like a lack of protein. Have the vitamins made any difference? If its a b deficiency, the chick should show almost immediate improvement as long as you are giving enough, but it also may be a combination of deficiency's.
     
  3. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    But what kind of protein? Soy, fish, or animal by-products? If you are concerned about protein levels and better diet you should make these considerations. Peafowl are not turkeys nor should they be fed like any bird that is fattened up for butcher. A healthy diet that builds the immune system and allows the bird to grow lean as in the wild will improve its system and keep it stronger allowing it to fend off disease.

    Gamebird feed is 28% so it can be cut for different uses, the uncut feed is suitable for peachicks up to eight weeks. Then it can be cut with grain which lowers the protein level to 24% until it reaches maturity when 16% is recommended as a holding maintenance feed. A slightly higher, 19% is used for a layer base.


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    However if you are concerned with the use of soy base feed and it drawbacks, then you should look at fish and animal byproducts based feeds which are better suited for game birds, especially fish as it is a natural feed in the wild. Animal and fish proteins are more readily processed by peafowl.

    The 'other' part of the equation is whole grains and vegetables, especially oats, barley, sweet potatoes and other vine plants.
     
  4. Teepea

    Teepea Out Of The Brooder

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    Yeah, she seems perfectly well now actually, I'll keep her on vitamins for a little longer though just in case.
     
  5. Teepea

    Teepea Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow Haha thanks for all that info, I'll see what I can do to give them a good diet.
     
  6. DragonClaw01

    DragonClaw01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree it's vitamins most likely, but they need a ood souce of protein. Gamebird feeds are made for such birds. Without proper research, other attempts may weaken them.
     
  7. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I Agree absolutely with dragonclaw, My prior post didn't intend to discount the importance of feeding correctly, I just meant that "wry neck" is usually a niacin deficiency, I personally believe from the hen.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  8. DragonClaw01

    DragonClaw01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In any animal, the body needs quite a bit of protien and nutrients while growing.

    If they do not get it from feed, their body will essentially cannibalize itself (first fat stores, then muscle) to try and keep itself running.

    If on an improper diet at a young age, they will be stunted for life.

    "The nutritional needs of your peafowl and what you feed peafowl varies according to their purpose. If breeding peafowl, you should feed them a gamebird maintenance formulation available from your local feed or farm supply store. Additionally, you may wish to supplement the peafowl feed with a high-protein, meat-based feed such as cat food (dog food is typically plant-based). Scratch grain will also be enjoyed by your peafowl and can be fed liberally.

    If raising peafowl from young chicks, feed the baby peafowl starter feed that is un-medicated. The starter peafowl feed should have a protein percentage of approximately 30%. From 6 weeks of age forward, you may reduce the protein percentages of the peacock feed to 19-20%. Once they reach a mature age, you may transition the peafowl to standard peacock and peahen feed as discussed previously."

    http://aboutpeafowl.com/feedingpeafowl.html


    Vitamins are an excellent choice to help boost their immune system and health.
     
  9. DylansMom

    DylansMom RIP 1969-2017 Premium Member

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    The amount of protein needed for healthy Peachicks, is and has been up for debate. I have raised all of my chicks on regular poultry starter with a protein content of about 18% for 20 years now. None have died because of a lack of sufficient protein, in fact last year none died after hatch at all. The starter I use is also medicated with amprolium and I would never use un-medicated feed, because I know we have cocci in our soil and they need the amprolium. It is IMHO a matter of finding what works for you personally. I was taught that too much protein can cause leg problems in chicks so I steer clear of gamebird feed, and nobody here has been stunted in any way.
     
    4 people like this.
  10. barkerg

    barkerg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ive heard the same thing about legs and too much protein but, most of the leg issues I have seen in peas have come during hatching. Some say its genetics and Ive also heard that lack of certain minerals can cause leg issues. I do agree that high protein all year is not good and a good balanced diet is what we strive for in our animals, they deserve it for sure.

    Gerald Barker
     
    2 people like this.

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