bad toe...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rynegold, May 24, 2011.

  1. rynegold

    rynegold Out Of The Brooder

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    One of our Favarolles roos has a toe that's turned under... can I splint it? correct it? I have extensive metalworking skills in minurature and was thinking of making a splint the length of the metatarsus conected to a flexable plastic piece for the toe so's to keep it extended for enough time to straighten' out.
    Our chicks are five weeks this thurs.

    Any thoughts?

    regards, m

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    favtoe14 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]

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    favtoe15 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]

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    favtoe13 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    I'm going to include a link that includes ways of treating crooked toes. Your idea sounds great. I think it is probably going to have to be straightened gradually because of the chick's age. These things are usually corrected much earlier than 5 weeks when the skeleton and joints are really pliable. I think you could fix this if you have the time and patience (extensive skills in metal working miniatures is also a great plus [​IMG].

    https://sites.google.com/a/larsencreek.com/chicken-orthopedics/leg-braces

    Good luck.
     
  3. rynegold

    rynegold Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks CMV!, for the link to the podietry page... thats an extensive page I'm sure I can use.....


    As for "what" I finally used for the splint, I went with kydex. Its a heat formed plastic that cuts and sands really well. Not only is it curved, but also "cupped" so that its not flat where it meets the metatarsal and toe but cupped a little so's to fit better.


    So here is my "kydex" foot correction device:

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    favtoea06 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]

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    favtoea08 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]

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    favtoea07 by rynegold, on Flickr[/img]
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2011
  4. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Wow! Beautiful work. Were you able to get the toe fully extended? How is the chick managing with it? Can it walk alright?
     
  5. rynegold

    rynegold Out Of The Brooder

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    Hey CMV, he's doing fine with it and it seems not to bother or hinder him at all. The others were mildly curious (as chickens are...) at first when we put him back in the coop but thats all. I didn't extend it fully yet: I plan on reorienting (reheating and straightening the splint some) in a week so's not to have to bend it so sharply this first time. It took considerable force to straighten the toe fully, so I'm thinking I'll do it half way for a week or so and then take the splint off and see what's up with said toe ... or should I have gone for straight to begin with?
     
  6. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    No, I think you are doing it better by straightening it a bit at a time. If it were younger then I would have extended it fully, but at this age I think it may take some time to get the toe where it belongs. I would fear that the tendons/ligaments could get torn or pulled away from their moorings if the toe is forced too much into an "unnatural" position (since its natural position is what you are trying to fix).

    You've done some fine work. Keep us posted on the results.

    Good luck.
     
  7. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Site update: For reference, the Poultry Podiatry website on chicken orthopedics & leg problems has moved to the new location linked in my sig line below.

    Very glad the site is being of help!
     
  8. rynegold

    rynegold Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks to SpeckledHills!

    Everyone should bookmark this site, it will save you many thread searches!
     

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