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Bee Hobbyists- I Need A Wild Swarm Removed!!!

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by suzettex5, May 23, 2011.

  1. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2009
    California
    If you are into bee-keeping, and are willing to come get these, bee's, they are yours for the taking! My hubby thinks they are a danger, so they have to go. I am trying to get them removed before he decides to spray them with poison and kill them. Of course, I am worried my chickens may eat the bees if he sprays them and get poisoned too. I really dont want the bees to be killed. They are definately honey bees, one stung me yesterday, so I got a good look at it.

    The few places I have called want 400 to 500 bucks! Way more than we can afford!
    The bees just arrived about 5 or 6 days ago, and are going into a wall on the outside of our barn, about 6 feet up. Not hard to access, but I think to get them out alive, the wall will need to be cut into a little bit. If no one can get them, I am afraid my hubby will spray them soon. They arent on the outside, like hanging from a tree or branch, they are inside a wall, but the wood is just thin material, and a bit on the older side, so it wont be hard to cut into, if need be.

    We live in Auburn, about 30 miles from Sacramento, towards Reno. If anyone is interested, or knows someone who they trust to remove bees, please PM me or just respond to this thread.

    Thanks!
     
  2. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Oh good grief. I wish I was so much closer. I have a couple of empty nuc hives that I could use to catch them.
     
  3. CowgirlJules

    CowgirlJules Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 26, 2010
    Atwater, CA
    Check craigslist, I see bee ads in the Farm and Garden section there all the time.
     
  4. Sooner

    Sooner My kids Mom!

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    Mar 22, 2009
    Oklahoma
    Or google to see if you have a bee keeping club in the area, I know most will come remove around here for free.
     
  5. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Quote:I agree 4-$500.00 is way high especialy when they will also make alot more $$ than that from those bee's in the future, honey, leasing to farmers etc. search Craigslist also.
     
  6. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2009
    California
    I have called everyone on CL, either they are too far away, want 100's of dollars, or dont speak enough english for me to communicate easily enough with them. I tried Beesource.com, but it gave me the same people listed on CL, just no help there, unfortunately.

    I did leave a message with one guy, I am hoping he will be able to call back soon. You would think that since my town is just surrounded with counties that have TONS of agricultural lots that are growing many, many kinds of foods, that there would be someone who could come get free bees. But no luck so far.

    I am going to keep trying for a few more days, but the hive is getting bigger and starting to have alot of workers hanging around the wall, and the sheer number is starting to block my path to my chicken pen and feed area. I SOOOO dont want to have to spray poison on them, its not fair to them, ya know, but I wont have a choice soon if no one with a reasonable plan doesnt step up.

    Any other ideas?
     
  7. Sooner

    Sooner My kids Mom!

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    Oklahoma
    What about listing on craigs list as a wanted item: "wanted honeybee swarm removed in blank county for free"
     
  8. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Well I do see your dilema so your choices are being limited by the day. As a 2nd to the last resort you could try to do some research and possibly dress evectively, go out there at night and and try to remove it yourself. I know it doesn't sound like your best option but perhaps you might find a way. As the last resort I do see where just spraying them may be your only option to protect your family and other livestock. I wish you all the luck and hope it get's worked out soon.
     
  9. NanaKat

    NanaKat Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Your hive has already chosen it's spot and is probably building wax comb now for the queen to lay eggs and for storage of pollen and honey. The longer you wait to erradicate them the harder it will be.

    If you don't purchase a hive body and super, you can build a simple box and a bottom board and top. The bottom board can be a piece of plywood 4 inches bigger on all sides than the box. The lid needs to have a lip of 1 x 2.5 boards around the sides to hold the lid down on the box... should fit like a shoebox lid. The box should be a minimum size of 14 x 18. On the bottom of one of the sides you will need a 1/2 x 3 inch piece cut out for the "door" to the hive. Temporarily plug the hole with newspaper.

    Old fashioned hive boxes did not have foundation frames in the. The swarm was simply captured and placed in the box for several days.
    Cover your hands with leather gloves and your face and head with a hat and some nettings....Wearing loose fitting white clothing is helpful...use tape or rubberbands to close the ankles and wrists.

    If you don't have a bee smoker, you can use a tin can with cotton fabric (makes the best smoke) and dry hay and a hand held fan to Smoke the bees in the evening. This causes the bees to engorge on honey and they will be more docile. Give them a good smoking...not too hot and then after a few minutes sweep them into the box with a soft brush. Insure you have the queen. She is bigger than the drones and workers and will be near the center of the hive. You will have to cut the wax from the barn wall and stand it in the box. This comb should have eggs, and honey and will keep the bees happy. Then cover the hive and set it on cinder blocks where you want the hive situated. Shade during the heat of the day is helpful. The next morning you should be able to pull the newspaper plug out of the door. The bees will search for water.

    Any bees left in the barn can then be sprayed and carefully collected so your chickens don't eat them. research bee-keeping. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011

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