best conditions to get a hen broody and can it ?can a leghorn go broody or is that 2 advanced??

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by strangeanimal, Apr 18, 2017.

  1. ,nothing special

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  2. happened right after a mating

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  3. (went for work/holiday and )the eggs were left in the nests

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. higher temperature

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  5. not enough roostingbars,slept on nest

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. was in minority ,really liked company so she wanted kids

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. had a time of isolation due (illnesses/injury,.....)just lonely and bored

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. another hen got broody , few days she followed that ,it is contagious!

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  9. they sat in a huge area and so filled that up by overcrowding with kids

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. they sat in a smaller area for just a short time yet turned suddenly broody

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  11. they just felt like superwoman ! even stock out their tongue to the cat

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  12. felt sad or lonely

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  13. another breed had been constantly violent and this breed felt in minority/ in danger , so wanted her

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  14. changed the food by giving other scraps

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  15. changed all food

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  16. this breed just gets very often(perhaps too often ) broody

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  17. seperated one to sit with the roo and there it was in a few days alone with him,they like to play mu

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  18. gave extra light every day to extend the 'day'

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  19. any other than this which I can not resist to share !!!

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  20. I am clueless , I was just as stunned as you are !

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. strangeanimal

    strangeanimal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2017
    Belgium
    Good day BYC'ers !

    I've started this thread so we could share some toughts and ideas about stimulating a hen to get her broody .
    So , I would like to ask the following things ;
    1. Has the food influence ? I mean this by change or some way /hours of feeding or just a totally different diet .
    secondly , is it now true or false you can never make a hen go broody and she decides this totally on her own ? So there is just nothing you can do to make sure she shall decide to become broody ? or yeah sure she is perfectly able to be made broody , just leave some eggs etc in the nest etc ??

    third question is in fact :
    what conditions do the hens have in common if they decided to go broody ??
    I mean did the weather change ? Did you add some different bushes ? some new food ? forgot to feed them ?
    are they in a big flock or is it always one that lives in a smaller flock and thinks to herself " pffffff I really need some better company because sarah is always talking about easter and we aaaaaal know it is not the easterbunny , so I want kids , now ? "

    Is it really so uncommon for a leghorn to turn broody ??? ( they are soon expired , uh retired :D , and I have never got them broody yet I would really like some chicks of them too , they're only with two which I find in fact sad , especially because they adapt themselves to any breed ! no fights ! never ever (besides for nesting box but they always want the best which is in fact exactly the same as the other ones but hey ;-) :p )
    Can they even get broody if you want to 'make ' them broody ?

    Anyway , I'd just like to know what do our fluffly friends actually all have in common in ' circumstances ' , ' temperature , state of moods etc ? '

    p.s. : Any comments welcome but just a little bit more interested in the breeds that NOT often go broody or not at all yet did go broody and certainly the conditions (no matter the breed )
     
  2. DancingWthDucks

    DancingWthDucks Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,065
    161
    166
    Feb 21, 2016
    Cumbria, UK
    I don't think that food has any influence- I didn't change the diet, and yet I have 2 girls (1 Wyandotte Bantam and 1 Silkie x Poish Bantam) who have gone broody.

    You can't 'make' a chicken broody- it depends on the individual bird and how strong an instinct she has. I've heard that Silkies are VERY broody, yet my girl has never been a 'clocker' (broody), so again it depends on the individual, but some breeds are more prone than others.

    My girls just go broody for no apparent reason- I've read that they normally go broody in spring/summer, but I've had broodies in November and December before (and we have very rainy, windy winters). I've found that if one goes broody, than several more will join her :rolleyes:....

    It's very rare for a Leghorn to go broody- the instinct has been bred out of them to make them more productive.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. strangeanimal

    strangeanimal Chillin' With My Peeps

    213
    34
    86
    Mar 21, 2017
    Belgium
    hi ,

    well I sort of noticed the same about silkies but also some other breeds that just go broody as if they are born for it . Unfurtunately I see on the worldwideweb here same info about hybrids , simply bred out of them , shame actually because they will in the end just become as hard to find that even their prices will go up ( due rare breed ) , now on the other hand , it is thanks to the hobbyfarmer these breeds are still here , well altough that is what every single site says :) . So in fact is is so that if you are having a rare breed or a breed that is not going to be broody and you have them you should be breeding them too , just because you help nature by doing that ( we already helped mother nature making them non broody so i think its somewhat a responsibility for the humankind to make sure they don't extinct ) , using another hen or an incubator ofcourse .

    About one going broody true enough you will soon see the rest go broody , here I witnessed this behavior :
    one is fighting over one nestingbox with a breed they dont get along with , she is a broody and finally has her nest yet now the other one turns out to be the best so she wants in ,
    usually entering that box would have been close to fatale to her but no now the other one is broody and they get along . ( I'm refering to a sussex vs a marans , the first days fought untill I seperated again because it could end up REALLY bad ) now being brood they are together in one box , odd isn't it ? :D it is contagious because one other hen started accting the same but i replaced the hens :)
    (marans got broody in december , crazy mama lol )
    what I did notice in the circumstances is that if one has been isolated for a few days due being pecked or so , she was more eager to stay broody ! So i'm really wondering what that was all about , I also use light to extend the day , only on darker days and winter , now obviously just let nature do its thing .
    about my leghorn here , I feel actually quite sad they are not ' natural ' anymore and don't want to reproduce themselves , I have now been looking on the internet about them being broody and actually it is not THAT exeptionally ! I've seen a lot of clips showing of a broody leghorn , a white one , but it is true , these are all exeptions , I hope one of my own leghorn will have that in her mind some day before she is too old , not going to force them ofcourse , that simply ain't possible .
    oh and if you need a broody ? not ONE ! if you don't need one ? they all go broody , as if they know it ;-) .
    ty for the input anyway ! it is always good to share info right ? :)
     

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