Best gift ever

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Lacey1988, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. Lacey1988

    Lacey1988 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looka what Santa(My mother & step dad) brought me for Christmas [​IMG]

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    Funny thing is I don't know anything about hatching eggs so be looking for me in the future lol
     
  2. gabrielle1976

    gabrielle1976 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh how exciteing do lots of reading https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-to-incubate-hatch-eggs-just-21-days-from-egg-to-chicken
    Thats the basics there but feel free to ask all the questions you want.
    Some things that might not go into are things like . Make sure when you set up your incubator that you have it in the most stable room tempature wise in your house , with no direct sunlight. Youll want to set up your incubator and let it run checking the temps and adjusting very tiny amounts and waiting between adjustments at least a few hours till you get it to 99.5 . You then want to run it for 24-48 while checking the temp several times a day and makeing sure it stays stable befor you put in the eggs. Remmber after you put in the eggs the temp is probly going to drop as the eggs are cool and need to be brought up to temp , there is no need to adjust the temp when it drops becuase of this becuase it should come back up once the eggs are 99.5 .
    If you dont have a turner make sure to mark your eggs with and x on one side and a o on the other and to turn them 3 times a day.
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  3. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    One more thing with that incubator (I was going to get one) don't rely on the thermometer and hygrometer it comes with they are not accurate. Put seperate one in it.
    Have fun with it Lacey and let us know how your out come is.
    Michele
     
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  4. Lacey1988

    Lacey1988 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yelp I figured that research research research ha but I don't mind. Thanks for the warning Michele I'll keep that in mind. I'm probably going to practice on a 'mutt' chicken's egg lol
     
  5. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    I really wanted one of those too. If someone gave me one I would be over the moon.
     
  6. Lacey1988

    Lacey1988 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I looked over the incubator and found an extra thermometer :)
     
  7. gabrielle1976

    gabrielle1976 Overrun With Chickens

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    Hows it going with the best gift ever?
     
  8. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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  9. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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    EXCELLENT ADVICE

    This is what I put in my article in regards to thermometers and temps.... the hatching 101 article lol https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatching-eggs-101

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    TEMPERATURE
    With a
    Forced Air Incubator (fan model) you can get the best hatch rate by keeping the temperature at 99.5º F. throughout the entire incubation period. HOWEVER, when using a Still Air incubator (no fan) at 102º F. The reason for different temperatures is that with a fan model the circulating air warms all around the egg while still air temperatures are warmer at the top of the egg than at the bottom. Therefore, increasing the temperature at the top of the egg will compensate for the egg's cooler parts. The temperature is measured at the level where the embryos develop (at the top of the egg). Minor fluctuations (less than ½ degree) above or below 100 degrees are tolerated. Temperatures only a degree or two above the recommended temperatures can kill chicks within 15-30 minutes depending on how high the temperature is and the developmental stage of the embryo. A high temperature tends to produce early hatches. A consistently cooler temperature tends to increase incubation times and produce weakened chicks. In both cases the total chicks hatched will be reduced. Prepare your incubator and run it for several days before adding eggs, to be positive you are maintaining correct incubation temperature. NOTE: It is common that when adding eggs the temperature will drop but should come back up to correct temperature within an hour or two. Don’t rest the thermometer's bulb touching the eggs or the incubator. Incorrect readings will result.

    CALIBRATION! YES! It’s IMPORTANT!
    Calibrate the thermometer/s you are using for your Incubator. I use 3 thermometers! You need to make sure your thermometer is reading correctly, Even one degree may cause serious problems with your hatch! A simple method without specialized instruments and knowledge is to compare your thermometer/hygrometer with other devices. If your thermometer (or the one you compare it with) goes at least from 0°C to 100°C you can also calibrate it with crushed ice. The therrmometer should read 32 degrees in a mixture of crushed ice and a little water. If it reads, say, 30 degrees, then you can either adjust the thermometer until it is correct (if the style of the thermometer permits adjustment), or else you will at least know your thermometer reads 2 degrees too cool and adjust your thinking--and your incubator--accordingly.
    More information on Calibrating your thermometer/hygrometer ~
    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-styrofoam-quotstill-airquot-egg-/step4/Calibrate-your-thermometerhygrometer/
    http://www.swowea.org/Thermometer%20Calibration.pdf


    Probe thermometer & water weasel (Water Wiggler, Water Snake) found on Amazon or Ebay make for EXCELLENT internal temp guides! The perfect internal temperature of an embryo is 99.5 degrees. If you cant find a water wiggler you can make your own with ziplock filled with water folded in half and insert the probe in the center middle.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Examples of thermometers and hygrometers
    I personally like to keep a digital one that also keeps track of “highs and lows” along with 2 incubator thermometers AND a PROBE! It depends on how scientific you plan your hatch!
    More Important than make/model is CALIBRATION.
    It NEEDS TO BE SPOT ON!


    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. Lacey1988

    Lacey1988 Chillin' With My Peeps

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