Best Grains for Sprouting?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by HomesteadDucks, Nov 24, 2015.

  1. HomesteadDucks

    HomesteadDucks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am thinking of buying organic grains to sprout for my ducks over the winter. I have heard that sprouting them will release extra nutrients so I figured it would be as close to grazing on grass that they will get this winter. Are any particular grains better than others for sprouting? Do any particular grains release specific nutrients that ducks need? Also, where would you recommend that I could buy these grains? I am looking for a price around $1 per pound or less (the same as my current duck feed).
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2015
  2. OrganicFarmWife

    OrganicFarmWife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Organic grains cost more, much more, then standard crops. So I do not know if you will find the price you are looking for. I was looking into sprouted grains and found to my sorrow soybeans, even sprouted, are not good for chickens.
    Wheat, I do not know how hard it is to sprout, might be cost wise a good option. The requirements to grow organic wheat are low and so there is more of it available.
    You can buy grains at most elevators. I would Google local organic grain suppliers.
     
  3. learycow

    learycow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    barley is the easiest crop to grow. I get it here for $2 per 5lb bag. They don't mold as easily as oats (also a cheap one to get around here) and they sprout very quickly
     
  4. HomesteadDucks

    HomesteadDucks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for letting me know about the barley. I just purchased a 50 lb bag of wheat and I am looking for some different grains to maybe get some variety in their sprouts. Just one thing though. What do you mean by "here"? Do you mean on this website... or where you live?
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2015
  5. learycow

    learycow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    By here I just mean locally (I'm in Maine)
     
  6. Twoandhelp

    Twoandhelp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is all good to know. I was just wondering if they would eat sprouted grain! Do yall sprouters use a grow light?
     
  7. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    I don't. I just set up the containers near a window - but they don't need light to sprout. If I want to grow them out for a few more days for greens, being near a window seems to be enough.
     
  8. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

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    Oats is another good one; I do wheat and oats in late winter when I get ansty for spring; I might even snag some of the wheatgrass sprouts for myself :D
     
  9. Twoandhelp

    Twoandhelp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks!
     
  10. LovesAGoodYolk

    LovesAGoodYolk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Barley is the best and wheat is second best. I get organic seeds/feed for something like 37 cents a pound. Each grain varies. I tried oats but am not as pleased. This is what I do.
    Buy some cheap plastic dish pans, or if you are unlucky you might have a supply of the plastic tubs from hospital stays. Drill very tiny holes all over the bottom of the pans. You will need about 10 pans as it takes 7-10 days for the sprouts to grow to optimum size. Soak the seeds in a bowl for a few hours or overnight. Next, pour the seeds into one of the plastic pans. Rinse well with water that is neither cold or hot. Allow it to drain well. Now you will need a much larger shallow plastic tub to set the sprout tubs into. Cover tub with a damp dish towel. Seeds/sprouts must be rinsed at least 3 times a day to keep them fresh, hydrated, and mold free. Seeds should be maximum of 1/2 inch deep when initially put in drainage tub. You will know they are ready when they look like new spring grass about 3" tall. I sometimes let them set out near a window on the last day of growth to allow them to turn as green as possible. They will also have a nice mat of thick white roots. Yum Yum. Ready to eat. Ducks and chickens love it. Would also make great rabbit food. Start a new batch every day. I cannot believe how much money this has saved me with my feed expenses.
     
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